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Captain Marvel (DC)(Earth-S - Fawcett)

Contribution History:
Date User Field Old Value New Value
2013-06-08 04:29:14 aaronmoish Alias Captain Marvel (DC)(Earth-S) Captain Marvel (DC)(Earth-S - Fawcett)
2012-02-01 17:03:00 aaronmoish Alias Captain Marvel (DC) (01 - Earth-S) Captain Marvel (DC)(Earth-S)
2011-09-24 08:36:53 Leader Vladimir Bio Billy and his sister Mary were separated following the death of their parents and left in the care of their uncle Ebenezer. Tragically, Ebenezer threw Billy out and stole his trust fund. Left penniless and homeless, Billy struggled through a sorrowful existence in Fawcett City, finding work as a newsboy. For shelter, he often slept in the subway terminals. One night, a mysterious stranger - later revealed to be the spirit of Billy's father - convinced Billy to follow him deep into the subway tunnels. There, Billy found a marvelous train decorated in strange hieroglyphics and mystic runes. Billy and the stranger rode the train deep into the bowels of the earth and arrived in a looming cavern that held grotesque statues symbolizing the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man. These enemies include Envy, Lust, Greed, Pride, Wrath, Sloth, and Gluttony. Their, Billy met the ancient wizard Shazam, a champion of mankind for thousands of years. Withered with age, Shazam sat on a throne poised ominously beneath a massive stone block suspended above as if by magic. The ancient wizard revealed that he had selected Billy to be his champion to fight for good as the "strongest and mightiest man in the world--Captain Marvel!" The great Wizard Shazam ordered Billy to speak his name, a thunderous Bolt of lighting exploded in the dark cavern and revealed the almighty form of Captain Marvel! S - for the endless wisdom of Solomon H - for the legendary strength of Hercules A - for the stamina and might of Atlas Z - for the overwhelming power of Zeus A - for the courage and invulnerability of Achilles M - for the peerless speed and power of flight of the god Mercury With that, the Wizard Shazam was immediately killed as the large granite block fell from above his throne. Billy vowed to fulfill his singular role. Whenever he needed advice, Billy lit a brazier near Shazam's throne, summoning the wizard's ghost. Marvel's first call to duty was saving the world from the evil mad scientist, Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana, who threatened to silence radio forever unless he was paid a large sum of money. Resuming his regular form, Billy told WHIZ radio mogul Sterling Morris that he could stop the Radio Silencer and Sivana; a disbelieving Morris offered Billy a job on the air if he could do so. After finding the crooks' hideout, Billy transformed into Captain Marvel, destroyed Sivana's radio silencing machine and apprehended his henchmen. Sivana escaped, setting the stage for a long line of future confrontations. Marvel transformed back into Billy, who presented the captured criminals and destroyed Radio Silencer to Sterling Morris. True to his word, Sterling Morris made Billy an on-air news reporter for WHIZ radio. Through his adventures, he soon gained a host of enemies, including Adolf Hitler's champion Captain Nazi, an older Egyptian renegade Marvel called Black Adam, an evil magic-powered brute named Ibac, and an artificially intelligent nuclear-powered robot called Mister Atom. The most notorious Captain Marvel villains, however, were the nefarious Mister Mind and his Monster Society Of Evil, which recruited several of Marvel's previous adversaries. In the early 1940s, Captain Marvel also gained allies in The Marvel Family, a collective of superheroes with similar powers and costumes to Captain Marvel's (by comparison, Superman spin-off character Superboy first appeared in 1944, while Supergirl first appeared in 1959). Early on marked the debut of the Lieutenant Marvels, the alter egos of three other boys who found that, by saying "Shazam!" in unison, they too could become Marvels. Soon a friend named Freddy Freeman, mortally wounded by an attack from Captain Nazi, was given the power to become teenage boy superhero Captain Marvel, Jr.. Eventually Billy and Freddy met Billy's long-lost twin sister Mary Bromfield, who discovered she could, by saying the magic word "Shazam", become teenage superheroine Mary Marvel. The first post-Crisis appearance of Captain Marvel was in the 1986 Legends miniseries. In 1987, Captain Marvel appeared as a member of the Justice League. That same year, he was also given his own miniseries, Shazam! The New Beginning. With the four-issue miniseries, writers Roy and Dann Thomas and artist Tom Mandrake attempted to re-launch the Captain Marvel mythos and bring the wizard Shazam, Doctor Sivana, Uncle Dudley, and Black Adam into the modern DC Universe with an altered origin story. In this miniseries, both Sivana and Dudley were Billy Batson's real uncles, who fought over the custody for the boy after his parents were killed (by Sivana) in a car accident. Black Adam is also present in the story as Sivana's partner in crime. The most notable change that Thomas and Justice League writers Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis introduced into the Captain Marvel mythos was that the personality of young Billy Batson is retained when he transforms into the Captain (classic-era comics tended to treat Captain Marvel and Billy as two separate personalities). This change would remain for all future appearances of the character as justification for his sunny, Golden-Age personality in the darker modern-day comic book world. (Captain Marvel's Justice League teammate Guy Gardner often jokingly referred to the innocent, pure-hearted Captain as "Captain Whitebread"). Another notable change in this version was the relocation of the Shazam characters from Fawcett City to San Francisco. The Power of Shazam In this version of the story, Billy's parents - archaeologists C. C. and Marylin Batson - were killed by their treacherous assistant, Theo Adam, while on a dig at the tomb of Rameses II at Abu Simbel, Egypt. Theo Adam was the resurrected non-powered form of Teth-Adam aka Black Adam. He also kidnaps Billy's sister Mary, who ends up missing. The wizard Shazam is made aware of all of these events, and (just as in the Fawcett origin) has Billy brought before him by the dark-clothed stranger, and grants the boy the power to become Captain Marvel. As Captain Marvel, Billy takes on the form of his late father, which is how Theo Adam guesses his identity, has a revelation about the power of Shazam, and becomes Black Adam using a scarab he stole from the tomb. After subduing Black Adam and his employer, the rich tycoon Doctor Sivana, Billy swears to find his sister as Captain Marvel. Captain Marvel became a member of the revived Justice Society of America and was featured prominently in that group alongside his nemesis Black Adam. Captain Marvel had originally joined the team to keep an eye on Adam, who had joined the JSA claiming to have reformed. Black Adam eventually left the JSA to instigate a takeover of his home country of Kahndaq; he had a fondness for the country, and wished to see the totalitarian regime done away with, in what he saw as justice. Captain Marvel remained with the team. During his tenure in the JSA, Marvel dated Courtney Whitmore, also known as Stargirl, which put him in an unusual position; while he could legally date Courtney as Billy Batson, it looked very strange for the grown-up Captain Marvel to be with the teenaged Stargirl. The Golden Age Flash, Jay Garrick, another JSA member, confronted Marvel about the issue. Rather than telling Garrick and the team the truth about his age, Marvel chose to follow the Wisdom of Solomon and leave the team and Courtney. The Marvel Family played an integral part the Infinite Crisis. The climax of the Day of Vengeance saw the Spectre engaged in a cosmic-level battle with the wizard Shazam. At the conclusion of this battle, Shazam was obliterated, and the Rock of Eternity burst apart into Earth's dimension, freeing scores of ancient magicks and evils that had been captured eons ago back into the Universe. In a later Day of Vengeance one-shot special, Captain Marvel and the Marvel Family then helped Zatanna and several other beings to capture the Seven Deadly Sins and rebuild the Rock of Eternity. Captain Marvel was then required to take over Shazam's role as caretaker of the Rock. Marvel was later shown fulfilling this role, although teetering on the brink of insanity, constantly talking back to the Seven Sins around him. During this time, Marvel was shown helping Black Adam grant Adrianna Tomaz the powers of the goddess Isis. Later that year, Captain Marvel presided at the marriage ceremony of Adam and Isis in Kahndaq. Black Adam's continued attempts to reform, and depicted Adam's formation of, with Captain Marvel's blessing, a "Black Marvel Family". Joining Black Adam in the Black Marvel Family were his wife Isis and her brother Osiris. Isis and Osiris are murdered by the "Four Horsemen", creatures engineered by a team of DC's mad scientist characters (Dr. Sivana among them). As a result, Black Adam takes his revenge out on the entire world, killing millions. Black Adam is halted for a few minutes, just the time needed for Captain Marvel to force a magic lightning bolt on him, turning Black Adam back to Teth-Adam and changing his magic word into an unknown one. The Trials of Shazam! and Final Crisis The Trials of Shazam!, a 12-issue maxi-series written by Judd Winick and illustrated by Howard Porter for the first eight issues and by Mauro Cascioli for the remaining four, began publication in August 2006. The series redefined the Shazam! mythos, the characters, and their place in the DC Universe. Trials of Shazam! featured Captain Marvel, now with a white costume and long white hair, taking over the role of the wizard Shazam under the name Marvel, while Captain Marvel Jr. and Mary Marvel lose their powers. A powerless Freddy Freeman is then drafted to prove himself worthy to the individual six gods evident in the "Shazam" acronym so that he can become their new champion and herald under the name Shazam, although a witch Sabina from the Council of Merlin attempts to take the power herself, as ordered by her father Merlin. Atlas is killed during the series by Sabina, but Apollo's healing replaces him. Marvel helps Freddy when he is trapped by the weight that Atlas bore. In the pages of the 2007-2008 Countdown to Final Crisis limited series, Black Adam gives the powerless Mary Batson his powers, turning her into a more villainous character. She eventually relinquishes the power and gets powers from the Olympians, but she is tempted by her old power. By the end of the series, as well as in DC's 2008-2009 Final Crisis limited series, the now black-costumed Mary Marvel, possessed by the evil New God DeSaad, becomes a villain, joining forces with Superman villain Darkseid and fighting both Supergirl and Freddy Freeman/Shazam, who turns her back using his lightning. Justice Society of America The redesigned Marvel made a few appearances in various DC comics outside of The Trials of Shazam! maxi-series for two years before returning in Justice Society of America (vol. 3) #23 in January 2009. Justice Society writer Geoff Johns collaborated with writer/artist Jerry Ordway to write a storyline that would again retool the Shazam! franchise. In the story, Marvel is ambushed by Black Adam and Isis, who are intent on taking over the Rock of Eternity. Isis robs Marvel of his powers by saying Shazam from a spell book to send lightning at him, and banishes a powerless Billy Batson back to Fawcett City, where he contacts the Justice Society for help. Upon arriving at the Rock of Eternity with Billy, the Justice Society fights Black Adam and Isis. Billy is abducted by the now evil Mary Marvel, who shares her powers with him and turns him into an evil teenage Captain Marvel. The evil Billy and Mary join Adam and Isis in fighting the Justice Society. However, Adam switches sides when Isis sets into action her plan to kill off humanity and destroy modern civilization. With the help of the Justice Society's Flash and the spirit of C.C Batson (Mary and Billy's father), the dead wizard Shazam's soul is retrieved from an underworld realm known as the Rock of Finality, and Adam gives up his powers to resurrect him from the statue he is imprisoned in. Shazam promptly takes his powers back from the other three Black Marvels, turns Adam and Isis into stone statues, and banishes Billy and Mary from the Rock of Eternity upon stating that they have failed him. He threatens to come after Freddy Freeman, as his powers come directly from the Gods. They are later seen walking the streets of Fawcett City while homeless and pondering the fate of their father's spirit. Blackest Night During Blackest Night, they are living in an apartment, and comment on how scary it is not to have their powers anymore. Shazam One-Shot Freddy is seen with Billy and Mary in their apartment. They reminisce about the past and how Mary now feels useless without her powers. Mary is later seen assaulting Freddy, Blaze appears. The scene cuts to a homeless shelter. Blaze is seen talking to Mary. She tells Mary that if she kills Freddy, she will restore Billy and Mary's powers. It cuts back. Blaze is seen breaking her promise to Mary. Seconds later the word 'Shazam' is heard, sending Blaze rocketing through the wall. It turns out Freddy was in on it too, only pretending to get killed. Blaze and Freddy fight in the streets. Blaze punches Freddy with a ring containing liquid from the river of the Styx, which is toxic to everyone besides the residents of Hell. Billy is seen telling Mary to distract Blaze while he helps Freddy wash off the toxic water. Freddy then follows by "killing" Blaze and sending her back to Hell. Later on, Freddy tells Billy and Mary that no matter what, he will find a way to restore their powers! Billy and his sister Mary were separated following the death of their parents and left in the care of their uncle Ebenezer. Tragically, Ebenezer threw Billy out and stole his trust fund. Left penniless and homeless, Billy struggled through a sorrowful existence in Fawcett City, finding work as a newsboy. For shelter, he often slept in the subway terminals. One night, a mysterious stranger - later revealed to be the spirit of Billy's father - convinced Billy to follow him deep into the subway tunnels. There, Billy found a marvelous train decorated in strange hieroglyphics and mystic runes. Billy and the stranger rode the train deep into the bowels of the earth and arrived in a looming cavern that held grotesque statues symbolizing the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man. These enemies include Envy, Lust, Greed, Pride, Wrath, Sloth, and Gluttony. Their, Billy met the ancient wizard Shazam, a champion of mankind for thousands of years. Withered with age, Shazam sat on a throne poised ominously beneath a massive stone block suspended above as if by magic. The ancient wizard revealed that he had selected Billy to be his champion to fight for good as the "strongest and mightiest man in the world--Captain Marvel!" The great Wizard Shazam ordered Billy to speak his name, a thunderous Bolt of lighting exploded in the dark cavern and revealed the almighty form of Captain Marvel! S - for the endless wisdom of Solomon H - for the legendary strength of Hercules A - for the stamina and might of Atlas Z - for the unlimited power of Zeus A - for the courage and invulnerability of Achilles M - for the unrivaled of flight of the god Mercury With that, the Wizard Shazam was immediately killed as the large granite block fell from above his throne. Billy vowed to fulfill his singular role. Whenever he needed advice, Billy lit a brazier near Shazam's throne, summoning the wizard's ghost. Honoring his commitment to the Wizard, Captain Marvel became the world's defender against the forces of evil.
2011-07-07 10:51:43 swamptours Alias Captain Marvel (DC) (01) Captain Marvel (DC) (01 - Earth-S)
2011-05-21 06:30:23 Shadow303030 Bio Billy and his sister Mary were separated following the death of their parents and left in the care of their uncle Ebenezer. Tragically, Ebenezer threw Billy out and stole his trust fund. Left penniless and homeless, Billy struggled through a sorrowful existence in Fawcett City, finding work as a newsboy. For shelter, he often slept in the subway terminals. One night, a mysterious stranger - later revealed to be the spirit of Billy's father - convinced Billy to follow him deep into the subway tunnels. There, Billy found a marvelous train decorated in strange hieroglyphics and mystic runes. Billy and the stranger rode the train deep into the bowels of the earth and arrived in a looming cavern that held grotesque statues symbolizing the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man. These enemies include Envy, Lust, Greed, Pride, Wrath, Sloth, and Gluttony. Their, Billy met the ancient wizard Shazam, a champion of mankind for thousands of years. Withered with age, Shazam sat on a throne poised ominously beneath a massive stone block suspended above as if by magic. The ancient wizard revealed that he had selected Billy to be his champion to fight for good as the "strongest and mightiest man in the world--Captain Marvel!" The great Wizard Shazam ordered Billy to speak his name, a thunderous Bolt of lighting exploded in the dark cavern and revealed the almighty form of Captain Marvel! S - for the endless wisdom of Solomon H - for the legendary strength of Hercules A - for the stamina and might of Atlas Z - for the overwhelming power of Zeus A - for the courage and invulnerability of Achilles M - for the peerless speed and power of flight of the god Mercury With that, the Wizard Shazam was immediately killed as the large granite block fell from above his throne. Billy vowed to fulfill his singular role. Whenever he needed advice, Billy lit a brazier near Shazam's throne, summoning the wizard's ghost. Marvel's first call to duty was saving the world from the evil mad scientist, Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana, who threatened to silence radio forever unless he was paid a large sum of money. Resuming his regular form, Billy told WHIZ radio mogul Sterling Morris that he could stop the Radio Silencer and Sivana; a disbelieving Morris offered Billy a job on the air if he could do so. After finding the crooks' hideout, Billy transformed into Captain Marvel, destroyed Sivana's radio silencing machine and apprehended his henchmen. Sivana escaped, setting the stage for a long line of future confrontations. Marvel transformed back into Billy, who presented the captured criminals and destroyed Radio Silencer to Sterling Morris. True to his word, Sterling Morris made Billy an on-air news reporter for WHIZ radio. Through his adventures, he soon gained a host of enemies, including Adolf Hitler's champion Captain Nazi, an older Egyptian renegade Marvel called Black Adam, an evil magic-powered brute named Ibac, and an artificially intelligent nuclear-powered robot called Mister Atom. The most notorious Captain Marvel villains, however, were the nefarious Mister Mind and his Monster Society Of Evil, which recruited several of Marvel's previous adversaries. In the early 1940s, Captain Marvel also gained allies in The Marvel Family, a collective of superheroes with similar powers and costumes to Captain Marvel's (by comparison, Superman spin-off character Superboy first appeared in 1944, while Supergirl first appeared in 1959). Early on marked the debut of the Lieutenant Marvels, the alter egos of three other boys who found that, by saying "Shazam!" in unison, they too could become Marvels. Soon a friend named Freddy Freeman, mortally wounded by an attack from Captain Nazi, was given the power to become teenage boy superhero Captain Marvel, Jr.. Eventually Billy and Freddy met Billy's long-lost twin sister Mary Bromfield, who discovered she could, by saying the magic word "Shazam", become teenage superheroine Mary Marvel. The first post-Crisis appearance of Captain Marvel was in the 1986 Legends miniseries. In 1987, Captain Marvel appeared as a member of the Justice League. That same year, he was also given his own miniseries, Shazam! The New Beginning. With the four-issue miniseries, writers Roy and Dann Thomas and artist Tom Mandrake attempted to re-launch the Captain Marvel mythos and bring the wizard Shazam, Doctor Sivana, Uncle Dudley, and Black Adam into the modern DC Universe with an altered origin story. In this miniseries, both Sivana and Dudley were Billy Batson's real uncles, who fought over the custody for the boy after his parents were killed (by Sivana) in a car accident. Black Adam is also present in the story as Sivana's partner in crime. The most notable change that Thomas and Justice League writers Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis introduced into the Captain Marvel mythos was that the personality of young Billy Batson is retained when he transforms into the Captain (classic-era comics tended to treat Captain Marvel and Billy as two separate personalities). This change would remain for all future appearances of the character as justification for his sunny, Golden-Age personality in the darker modern-day comic book world. (Captain Marvel's Justice League teammate Guy Gardner often jokingly referred to the innocent, pure-hearted Captain as "Captain Whitebread"). Another notable change in this version was the relocation of the Shazam characters from Fawcett City to San Francisco. The Power of Shazam In this version of the story, Billy's parents - archaeologists C. C. and Marylin Batson - were killed by their treacherous assistant, Theo Adam, while on a dig at the tomb of Rameses II at Abu Simbel, Egypt. Theo Adam was the resurrected non-powered form of Teth-Adam aka Black Adam. He also kidnaps Billy's sister Mary, who ends up missing. The wizard Shazam is made aware of all of these events, and (just as in the Fawcett origin) has Billy brought before him by the dark-clothed stranger, and grants the boy the power to become Captain Marvel. As Captain Marvel, Billy takes on the form of his late father, which is how Theo Adam guesses his identity, has a revelation about the power of Shazam, and becomes Black Adam using a scarab he stole from the tomb. After subduing Black Adam and his employer, the rich tycoon Doctor Sivana, Billy swears to find his sister as Captain Marvel. Captain Marvel became a member of the revived Justice Society of America and was featured prominently in that group alongside his nemesis Black Adam. Captain Marvel had originally joined the team to keep an eye on Adam, who had joined the JSA claiming to have reformed. Black Adam eventually left the JSA to instigate a takeover of his home country of Kahndaq; he had a fondness for the country, and wished to see the totalitarian regime done away with, in what he saw as justice. Captain Marvel remained with the team. During his tenure in the JSA, Marvel dated Courtney Whitmore, also known as Stargirl, which put him in an unusual position; while he could legally date Courtney as Billy Batson, it looked very strange for the grown-up Captain Marvel to be with the teenaged Stargirl. The Golden Age Flash, Jay Garrick, another JSA member, confronted Marvel about the issue. Rather than telling Garrick and the team the truth about his age, Marvel chose to follow the Wisdom of Solomon and leave the team and Courtney. Captain Marvel transforms into Marvel. Art by Howard Porter. Added by CleverGuyThe Marvel Family played an integral part the Infinite Crisis. The climax of the Day of Vengeance saw the Spectre engaged in a cosmic-level battle with the wizard Shazam. At the conclusion of this battle, Shazam was obliterated, and the Rock of Eternity burst apart into Earth's dimension, freeing scores of ancient magicks and evils that had been captured eons ago back into the Universe. In a later Day of Vengeance one-shot special, Captain Marvel and the Marvel Family then helped Zatanna and several other beings to capture the Seven Deadly Sins and rebuild the Rock of Eternity. Captain Marvel was then required to take over Shazam's role as caretaker of the Rock. Marvel was later shown fulfilling this role, although teetering on the brink of insanity, constantly talking back to the Seven Sins around him. During this time, Marvel was shown helping Black Adam grant Adrianna Tomaz the powers of the goddess Isis. Later that year, Captain Marvel presided at the marriage ceremony of Adam and Isis in Kahndaq. Black Adam's continued attempts to reform, and depicted Adam's formation of, with Captain Marvel's blessing, a "Black Marvel Family". Joining Black Adam in the Black Marvel Family were his wife Isis and her brother Osiris. Isis and Osiris are murdered by the "Four Horsemen", creatures engineered by a team of DC's mad scientist characters (Dr. Sivana among them). As a result, Black Adam takes his revenge out on the entire world, killing millions. Black Adam is halted for a few minutes, just the time needed for Captain Marvel to force a magic lightning bolt on him, turning Black Adam back to Teth-Adam and changing his magic word into an unknown one. The Trials of Shazam! and Final Crisis The Trials of Shazam!, a 12-issue maxi-series written by Judd Winick and illustrated by Howard Porter for the first eight issues and by Mauro Cascioli for the remaining four, began publication in August 2006. The series redefined the Shazam! mythos, the characters, and their place in the DC Universe. Trials of Shazam! featured Captain Marvel, now with a white costume and long white hair, taking over the role of the wizard Shazam under the name Marvel, while Captain Marvel Jr. and Mary Marvel lose their powers. A powerless Freddy Freeman is then drafted to prove himself worthy to the individual six gods evident in the "Shazam" acronym so that he can become their new champion and herald under the name Shazam, although a witch Sabina from the Council of Merlin attempts to take the power herself, as ordered by her father Merlin. Atlas is killed during the series by Sabina, but Apollo's healing replaces him. Marvel helps Freddy when he is trapped by the weight that Atlas bore. In the pages of the 2007-2008 Countdown to Final Crisis limited series, Black Adam gives the powerless Mary Batson his powers, turning her into a more villainous character. She eventually relinquishes the power and gets powers from the Olympians, but she is tempted by her old power. By the end of the series, as well as in DC's 2008-2009 Final Crisis limited series, the now black-costumed Mary Marvel, possessed by the evil New God DeSaad, becomes a villain, joining forces with Superman villain Darkseid and fighting both Supergirl and Freddy Freeman/Shazam, who turns her back using his lightning. Justice Society of America The redesigned Marvel made a few appearances in various DC comics outside of The Trials of Shazam! maxi-series for two years before returning in Justice Society of America (vol. 3) #23 in January 2009. Justice Society writer Geoff Johns collaborated with writer/artist Jerry Ordway to write a storyline that would again retool the Shazam! franchise. In the story, Marvel is ambushed by Black Adam and Isis, who are intent on taking over the Rock of Eternity. Isis robs Marvel of his powers by saying Shazam from a spell book to send lightning at him, and banishes a powerless Billy Batson back to Fawcett City, where he contacts the Justice Society for help. Upon arriving at the Rock of Eternity with Billy, the Justice Society fights Black Adam and Isis. Billy is abducted by the now evil Mary Marvel, who shares her powers with him and turns him into an evil teenage Captain Marvel. The evil Billy and Mary join Adam and Isis in fighting the Justice Society. However, Adam switches sides when Isis sets into action her plan to kill off humanity and destroy modern civilization. With the help of the Justice Society's Flash and the spirit of C.C Batson (Mary and Billy's father), the dead wizard Shazam's soul is retrieved from an underworld realm known as the Rock of Finality, and Adam gives up his powers to resurrect him from the statue he is imprisoned in. Shazam promptly takes his powers back from the other three Black Marvels, turns Adam and Isis into stone statues, and banishes Billy and Mary from the Rock of Eternity upon stating that they have failed him. He threatens to come after Freddy Freeman, as his powers come directly from the Gods. They are later seen walking the streets of Fawcett City while homeless and pondering the fate of their father's spirit. Blackest Night During Blackest Night, they are living in an apartment, and comment on how scary it is not to have their powers anymore. Shazam One-Shot Freddy is seen with Billy and Mary in their apartment. They reminisce about the past and how Mary now feels useless without her powers. Mary is later seen assaulting Freddy, Blaze appears. The scene cuts to a homeless shelter. Blaze is seen talking to Mary. She tells Mary that if she kills Freddy, she will restore Billy and Mary's powers. It cuts back. Blaze is seen breaking her promise to Mary. Seconds later the word 'Shazam' is heard, sending Blaze rocketing through the wall. It turns out Freddy was in on it too, only pretending to get killed. Blaze and Freddy fight in the streets. Blaze punches Freddy with a ring containing liquid from the river of the Styx, which is toxic to everyone besides the residents of Hell. Billy is seen telling Mary to distract Blaze while he helps Freddy wash off the toxic water. Freddy then follows by "killing" Blaze and sending her back to Hell. Later on, Freddy tells Billy and Mary that no matter what, he will find a way to restore their powers! Billy and his sister Mary were separated following the death of their parents and left in the care of their uncle Ebenezer. Tragically, Ebenezer threw Billy out and stole his trust fund. Left penniless and homeless, Billy struggled through a sorrowful existence in Fawcett City, finding work as a newsboy. For shelter, he often slept in the subway terminals. One night, a mysterious stranger - later revealed to be the spirit of Billy's father - convinced Billy to follow him deep into the subway tunnels. There, Billy found a marvelous train decorated in strange hieroglyphics and mystic runes. Billy and the stranger rode the train deep into the bowels of the earth and arrived in a looming cavern that held grotesque statues symbolizing the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man. These enemies include Envy, Lust, Greed, Pride, Wrath, Sloth, and Gluttony. Their, Billy met the ancient wizard Shazam, a champion of mankind for thousands of years. Withered with age, Shazam sat on a throne poised ominously beneath a massive stone block suspended above as if by magic. The ancient wizard revealed that he had selected Billy to be his champion to fight for good as the "strongest and mightiest man in the world--Captain Marvel!" The great Wizard Shazam ordered Billy to speak his name, a thunderous Bolt of lighting exploded in the dark cavern and revealed the almighty form of Captain Marvel! S - for the endless wisdom of Solomon H - for the legendary strength of Hercules A - for the stamina and might of Atlas Z - for the overwhelming power of Zeus A - for the courage and invulnerability of Achilles M - for the peerless speed and power of flight of the god Mercury With that, the Wizard Shazam was immediately killed as the large granite block fell from above his throne. Billy vowed to fulfill his singular role. Whenever he needed advice, Billy lit a brazier near Shazam's throne, summoning the wizard's ghost. Marvel's first call to duty was saving the world from the evil mad scientist, Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana, who threatened to silence radio forever unless he was paid a large sum of money. Resuming his regular form, Billy told WHIZ radio mogul Sterling Morris that he could stop the Radio Silencer and Sivana; a disbelieving Morris offered Billy a job on the air if he could do so. After finding the crooks' hideout, Billy transformed into Captain Marvel, destroyed Sivana's radio silencing machine and apprehended his henchmen. Sivana escaped, setting the stage for a long line of future confrontations. Marvel transformed back into Billy, who presented the captured criminals and destroyed Radio Silencer to Sterling Morris. True to his word, Sterling Morris made Billy an on-air news reporter for WHIZ radio. Through his adventures, he soon gained a host of enemies, including Adolf Hitler's champion Captain Nazi, an older Egyptian renegade Marvel called Black Adam, an evil magic-powered brute named Ibac, and an artificially intelligent nuclear-powered robot called Mister Atom. The most notorious Captain Marvel villains, however, were the nefarious Mister Mind and his Monster Society Of Evil, which recruited several of Marvel's previous adversaries. In the early 1940s, Captain Marvel also gained allies in The Marvel Family, a collective of superheroes with similar powers and costumes to Captain Marvel's (by comparison, Superman spin-off character Superboy first appeared in 1944, while Supergirl first appeared in 1959). Early on marked the debut of the Lieutenant Marvels, the alter egos of three other boys who found that, by saying "Shazam!" in unison, they too could become Marvels. Soon a friend named Freddy Freeman, mortally wounded by an attack from Captain Nazi, was given the power to become teenage boy superhero Captain Marvel, Jr.. Eventually Billy and Freddy met Billy's long-lost twin sister Mary Bromfield, who discovered she could, by saying the magic word "Shazam", become teenage superheroine Mary Marvel. The first post-Crisis appearance of Captain Marvel was in the 1986 Legends miniseries. In 1987, Captain Marvel appeared as a member of the Justice League. That same year, he was also given his own miniseries, Shazam! The New Beginning. With the four-issue miniseries, writers Roy and Dann Thomas and artist Tom Mandrake attempted to re-launch the Captain Marvel mythos and bring the wizard Shazam, Doctor Sivana, Uncle Dudley, and Black Adam into the modern DC Universe with an altered origin story. In this miniseries, both Sivana and Dudley were Billy Batson's real uncles, who fought over the custody for the boy after his parents were killed (by Sivana) in a car accident. Black Adam is also present in the story as Sivana's partner in crime. The most notable change that Thomas and Justice League writers Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis introduced into the Captain Marvel mythos was that the personality of young Billy Batson is retained when he transforms into the Captain (classic-era comics tended to treat Captain Marvel and Billy as two separate personalities). This change would remain for all future appearances of the character as justification for his sunny, Golden-Age personality in the darker modern-day comic book world. (Captain Marvel's Justice League teammate Guy Gardner often jokingly referred to the innocent, pure-hearted Captain as "Captain Whitebread"). Another notable change in this version was the relocation of the Shazam characters from Fawcett City to San Francisco. The Power of Shazam In this version of the story, Billy's parents - archaeologists C. C. and Marylin Batson - were killed by their treacherous assistant, Theo Adam, while on a dig at the tomb of Rameses II at Abu Simbel, Egypt. Theo Adam was the resurrected non-powered form of Teth-Adam aka Black Adam. He also kidnaps Billy's sister Mary, who ends up missing. The wizard Shazam is made aware of all of these events, and (just as in the Fawcett origin) has Billy brought before him by the dark-clothed stranger, and grants the boy the power to become Captain Marvel. As Captain Marvel, Billy takes on the form of his late father, which is how Theo Adam guesses his identity, has a revelation about the power of Shazam, and becomes Black Adam using a scarab he stole from the tomb. After subduing Black Adam and his employer, the rich tycoon Doctor Sivana, Billy swears to find his sister as Captain Marvel. Captain Marvel became a member of the revived Justice Society of America and was featured prominently in that group alongside his nemesis Black Adam. Captain Marvel had originally joined the team to keep an eye on Adam, who had joined the JSA claiming to have reformed. Black Adam eventually left the JSA to instigate a takeover of his home country of Kahndaq; he had a fondness for the country, and wished to see the totalitarian regime done away with, in what he saw as justice. Captain Marvel remained with the team. During his tenure in the JSA, Marvel dated Courtney Whitmore, also known as Stargirl, which put him in an unusual position; while he could legally date Courtney as Billy Batson, it looked very strange for the grown-up Captain Marvel to be with the teenaged Stargirl. The Golden Age Flash, Jay Garrick, another JSA member, confronted Marvel about the issue. Rather than telling Garrick and the team the truth about his age, Marvel chose to follow the Wisdom of Solomon and leave the team and Courtney. The Marvel Family played an integral part the Infinite Crisis. The climax of the Day of Vengeance saw the Spectre engaged in a cosmic-level battle with the wizard Shazam. At the conclusion of this battle, Shazam was obliterated, and the Rock of Eternity burst apart into Earth's dimension, freeing scores of ancient magicks and evils that had been captured eons ago back into the Universe. In a later Day of Vengeance one-shot special, Captain Marvel and the Marvel Family then helped Zatanna and several other beings to capture the Seven Deadly Sins and rebuild the Rock of Eternity. Captain Marvel was then required to take over Shazam's role as caretaker of the Rock. Marvel was later shown fulfilling this role, although teetering on the brink of insanity, constantly talking back to the Seven Sins around him. During this time, Marvel was shown helping Black Adam grant Adrianna Tomaz the powers of the goddess Isis. Later that year, Captain Marvel presided at the marriage ceremony of Adam and Isis in Kahndaq. Black Adam's continued attempts to reform, and depicted Adam's formation of, with Captain Marvel's blessing, a "Black Marvel Family". Joining Black Adam in the Black Marvel Family were his wife Isis and her brother Osiris. Isis and Osiris are murdered by the "Four Horsemen", creatures engineered by a team of DC's mad scientist characters (Dr. Sivana among them). As a result, Black Adam takes his revenge out on the entire world, killing millions. Black Adam is halted for a few minutes, just the time needed for Captain Marvel to force a magic lightning bolt on him, turning Black Adam back to Teth-Adam and changing his magic word into an unknown one. The Trials of Shazam! and Final Crisis The Trials of Shazam!, a 12-issue maxi-series written by Judd Winick and illustrated by Howard Porter for the first eight issues and by Mauro Cascioli for the remaining four, began publication in August 2006. The series redefined the Shazam! mythos, the characters, and their place in the DC Universe. Trials of Shazam! featured Captain Marvel, now with a white costume and long white hair, taking over the role of the wizard Shazam under the name Marvel, while Captain Marvel Jr. and Mary Marvel lose their powers. A powerless Freddy Freeman is then drafted to prove himself worthy to the individual six gods evident in the "Shazam" acronym so that he can become their new champion and herald under the name Shazam, although a witch Sabina from the Council of Merlin attempts to take the power herself, as ordered by her father Merlin. Atlas is killed during the series by Sabina, but Apollo's healing replaces him. Marvel helps Freddy when he is trapped by the weight that Atlas bore. In the pages of the 2007-2008 Countdown to Final Crisis limited series, Black Adam gives the powerless Mary Batson his powers, turning her into a more villainous character. She eventually relinquishes the power and gets powers from the Olympians, but she is tempted by her old power. By the end of the series, as well as in DC's 2008-2009 Final Crisis limited series, the now black-costumed Mary Marvel, possessed by the evil New God DeSaad, becomes a villain, joining forces with Superman villain Darkseid and fighting both Supergirl and Freddy Freeman/Shazam, who turns her back using his lightning. Justice Society of America The redesigned Marvel made a few appearances in various DC comics outside of The Trials of Shazam! maxi-series for two years before returning in Justice Society of America (vol. 3) #23 in January 2009. Justice Society writer Geoff Johns collaborated with writer/artist Jerry Ordway to write a storyline that would again retool the Shazam! franchise. In the story, Marvel is ambushed by Black Adam and Isis, who are intent on taking over the Rock of Eternity. Isis robs Marvel of his powers by saying Shazam from a spell book to send lightning at him, and banishes a powerless Billy Batson back to Fawcett City, where he contacts the Justice Society for help. Upon arriving at the Rock of Eternity with Billy, the Justice Society fights Black Adam and Isis. Billy is abducted by the now evil Mary Marvel, who shares her powers with him and turns him into an evil teenage Captain Marvel. The evil Billy and Mary join Adam and Isis in fighting the Justice Society. However, Adam switches sides when Isis sets into action her plan to kill off humanity and destroy modern civilization. With the help of the Justice Society's Flash and the spirit of C.C Batson (Mary and Billy's father), the dead wizard Shazam's soul is retrieved from an underworld realm known as the Rock of Finality, and Adam gives up his powers to resurrect him from the statue he is imprisoned in. Shazam promptly takes his powers back from the other three Black Marvels, turns Adam and Isis into stone statues, and banishes Billy and Mary from the Rock of Eternity upon stating that they have failed him. He threatens to come after Freddy Freeman, as his powers come directly from the Gods. They are later seen walking the streets of Fawcett City while homeless and pondering the fate of their father's spirit. Blackest Night During Blackest Night, they are living in an apartment, and comment on how scary it is not to have their powers anymore. Shazam One-Shot Freddy is seen with Billy and Mary in their apartment. They reminisce about the past and how Mary now feels useless without her powers. Mary is later seen assaulting Freddy, Blaze appears. The scene cuts to a homeless shelter. Blaze is seen talking to Mary. She tells Mary that if she kills Freddy, she will restore Billy and Mary's powers. It cuts back. Blaze is seen breaking her promise to Mary. Seconds later the word 'Shazam' is heard, sending Blaze rocketing through the wall. It turns out Freddy was in on it too, only pretending to get killed. Blaze and Freddy fight in the streets. Blaze punches Freddy with a ring containing liquid from the river of the Styx, which is toxic to everyone besides the residents of Hell. Billy is seen telling Mary to distract Blaze while he helps Freddy wash off the toxic water. Freddy then follows by "killing" Blaze and sending her back to Hell. Later on, Freddy tells Billy and Mary that no matter what, he will find a way to restore their powers!
2011-05-21 06:16:49 Shadow303030 Alias Captain Marvel (DC) (01 - Earth-S) Captain Marvel (DC) (01)
2011-05-21 06:16:49 Shadow303030 Bio Billy and his sister Mary were separated following the death of their parents and left in the care of their uncle Ebenezer. Tragically, Ebenezer threw Billy out and stole his trust fund. Left penniless and homeless, Billy struggled through a sorrowful existence in Fawcett City, finding work as a newsboy. For shelter, he often slept in the subway terminals. One night, a mysterious stranger - later revealed to be the spirit of Billy's father - convinced Billy to follow him deep into the subway tunnels. There, Billy found a marvelous train decorated in strange hieroglyphics and mystic runes. Billy and the stranger rode the train deep into the bowels of the earth and arrived in a looming cavern that held grotesque statues symbolizing the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man. These enemies include Envy, Lust, Greed, Pride, Wrath, Sloth, and Gluttony. Their, Billy met the ancient wizard Shazam, a champion of mankind for thousands of years. Withered with age, Shazam sat on a throne poised ominously beneath a massive stone block suspended above as if by magic. The ancient wizard revealed that he had selected Billy to be his champion to fight for good as the "strongest and mightiest man in the world--Captain Marvel!" The great Wizard Shazam ordered Billy to speak his name, a thunderous Bolt of lighting exploded in the dark cavern and revealed the almighty form of Captain Marvel! S - for the endless wisdom of Solomon H - for the legendary strength of Hercules A - for the stamina and might of Atlas Z - for the overwhelming power of Zeus A - for the courage and invulnerability of Achilles M - for the peerless speed and power of flight of the god Mercury With that, the Wizard Shazam was immediately killed as the large granite block fell from above his throne. Billy vowed to fulfill his singular role. Whenever he needed advice, Billy lit a brazier near Shazam's throne, summoning the wizard's ghost. Marvel's first call to duty was saving the world from the evil mad scientist, Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana, who threatened to silence radio forever unless he was paid a large sum of money. Resuming his regular form, Billy told WHIZ radio mogul Sterling Morris that he could stop the Radio Silencer and Sivana; a disbelieving Morris offered Billy a job on the air if he could do so. After finding the crooks' hideout, Billy transformed into Captain Marvel, destroyed Sivana's radio silencing machine and apprehended his henchmen. Sivana escaped, setting the stage for a long line of future confrontations. Marvel transformed back into Billy, who presented the captured criminals and destroyed Radio Silencer to Sterling Morris. True to his word, Sterling Morris made Billy an on-air news reporter for WHIZ radio. Through his adventures, he soon gained a host of enemies, including Adolf Hitler's champion Captain Nazi, an older Egyptian renegade Marvel called Black Adam, an evil magic-powered brute named Ibac, and an artificially intelligent nuclear-powered robot called Mister Atom. The most notorious Captain Marvel villains, however, were the nefarious Mister Mind and his Monster Society Of Evil, which recruited several of Marvel's previous adversaries. In the early 1940s, Captain Marvel also gained allies in The Marvel Family, a collective of superheroes with similar powers and costumes to Captain Marvel's (by comparison, Superman spin-off character Superboy first appeared in 1944, while Supergirl first appeared in 1959). Early on marked the debut of the Lieutenant Marvels, the alter egos of three other boys who found that, by saying "Shazam!" in unison, they too could become Marvels. Soon a friend named Freddy Freeman, mortally wounded by an attack from Captain Nazi, was given the power to become teenage boy superhero Captain Marvel, Jr.. Eventually Billy and Freddy met Billy's long-lost twin sister Mary Bromfield, who discovered she could, by saying the magic word "Shazam", become teenage superheroine Mary Marvel. The first post-Crisis appearance of Captain Marvel was in the 1986 Legends miniseries. In 1987, Captain Marvel appeared as a member of the Justice League. That same year, he was also given his own miniseries, Shazam! The New Beginning. With the four-issue miniseries, writers Roy and Dann Thomas and artist Tom Mandrake attempted to re-launch the Captain Marvel mythos and bring the wizard Shazam, Doctor Sivana, Uncle Dudley, and Black Adam into the modern DC Universe with an altered origin story. In this miniseries, both Sivana and Dudley were Billy Batson's real uncles, who fought over the custody for the boy after his parents were killed (by Sivana) in a car accident. Black Adam is also present in the story as Sivana's partner in crime. The most notable change that Thomas and Justice League writers Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis introduced into the Captain Marvel mythos was that the personality of young Billy Batson is retained when he transforms into the Captain (classic-era comics tended to treat Captain Marvel and Billy as two separate personalities). This change would remain for all future appearances of the character as justification for his sunny, Golden-Age personality in the darker modern-day comic book world. (Captain Marvel's Justice League teammate Guy Gardner often jokingly referred to the innocent, pure-hearted Captain as "Captain Whitebread"). Another notable change in this version was the relocation of the Shazam characters from Fawcett City to San Francisco. The Power of Shazam In this version of the story, Billy's parents - archaeologists C. C. and Marylin Batson - were killed by their treacherous assistant, Theo Adam, while on a dig at the tomb of Rameses II at Abu Simbel, Egypt. Theo Adam was the resurrected non-powered form of Teth-Adam aka Black Adam. He also kidnaps Billy's sister Mary, who ends up missing. The wizard Shazam is made aware of all of these events, and (just as in the Fawcett origin) has Billy brought before him by the dark-clothed stranger, and grants the boy the power to become Captain Marvel. As Captain Marvel, Billy takes on the form of his late father, which is how Theo Adam guesses his identity, has a revelation about the power of Shazam, and becomes Black Adam using a scarab he stole from the tomb. After subduing Black Adam and his employer, the rich tycoon Doctor Sivana, Billy swears to find his sister as Captain Marvel. Captain Marvel became a member of the revived Justice Society of America and was featured prominently in that group alongside his nemesis Black Adam. Captain Marvel had originally joined the team to keep an eye on Adam, who had joined the JSA claiming to have reformed. Black Adam eventually left the JSA to instigate a takeover of his home country of Kahndaq; he had a fondness for the country, and wished to see the totalitarian regime done away with, in what he saw as justice. Captain Marvel remained with the team. During his tenure in the JSA, Marvel dated Courtney Whitmore, also known as Stargirl, which put him in an unusual position; while he could legally date Courtney as Billy Batson, it looked very strange for the grown-up Captain Marvel to be with the teenaged Stargirl. The Golden Age Flash, Jay Garrick, another JSA member, confronted Marvel about the issue. Rather than telling Garrick and the team the truth about his age, Marvel chose to follow the Wisdom of Solomon and leave the team and Courtney. Captain Marvel transforms into Marvel. Art by Howard Porter. Added by CleverGuyThe Marvel Family played an integral part the Infinite Crisis. The climax of the Day of Vengeance saw the Spectre engaged in a cosmic-level battle with the wizard Shazam. At the conclusion of this battle, Shazam was obliterated, and the Rock of Eternity burst apart into Earth's dimension, freeing scores of ancient magicks and evils that had been captured eons ago back into the Universe. In a later Day of Vengeance one-shot special, Captain Marvel and the Marvel Family then helped Zatanna and several other beings to capture the Seven Deadly Sins and rebuild the Rock of Eternity. Captain Marvel was then required to take over Shazam's role as caretaker of the Rock. Marvel was later shown fulfilling this role, although teetering on the brink of insanity, constantly talking back to the Seven Sins around him. During this time, Marvel was shown helping Black Adam grant Adrianna Tomaz the powers of the goddess Isis. Later that year, Captain Marvel presided at the marriage ceremony of Adam and Isis in Kahndaq. Black Adam's continued attempts to reform, and depicted Adam's formation of, with Captain Marvel's blessing, a "Black Marvel Family". Joining Black Adam in the Black Marvel Family were his wife Isis and her brother Osiris. Isis and Osiris are murdered by the "Four Horsemen", creatures engineered by a team of DC's mad scientist characters (Dr. Sivana among them). As a result, Black Adam takes his revenge out on the entire world, killing millions. Black Adam is halted for a few minutes, just the time needed for Captain Marvel to force a magic lightning bolt on him, turning Black Adam back to Teth-Adam and changing his magic word into an unknown one. The Trials of Shazam! and Final Crisis The Trials of Shazam!, a 12-issue maxi-series written by Judd Winick and illustrated by Howard Porter for the first eight issues and by Mauro Cascioli for the remaining four, began publication in August 2006. The series redefined the Shazam! mythos, the characters, and their place in the DC Universe. Trials of Shazam! featured Captain Marvel, now with a white costume and long white hair, taking over the role of the wizard Shazam under the name Marvel, while Captain Marvel Jr. and Mary Marvel lose their powers. A powerless Freddy Freeman is then drafted to prove himself worthy to the individual six gods evident in the "Shazam" acronym so that he can become their new champion and herald under the name Shazam, although a witch Sabina from the Council of Merlin attempts to take the power herself, as ordered by her father Merlin. Atlas is killed during the series by Sabina, but Apollo's healing replaces him. Marvel helps Freddy when he is trapped by the weight that Atlas bore. In the pages of the 2007-2008 Countdown to Final Crisis limited series, Black Adam gives the powerless Mary Batson his powers, turning her into a more villainous character. She eventually relinquishes the power and gets powers from the Olympians, but she is tempted by her old power. By the end of the series, as well as in DC's 2008-2009 Final Crisis limited series, the now black-costumed Mary Marvel, possessed by the evil New God DeSaad, becomes a villain, joining forces with Superman villain Darkseid and fighting both Supergirl and Freddy Freeman/Shazam, who turns her back using his lightning. Justice Society of America The redesigned Marvel made a few appearances in various DC comics outside of The Trials of Shazam! maxi-series for two years before returning in Justice Society of America (vol. 3) #23 in January 2009. Justice Society writer Geoff Johns collaborated with writer/artist Jerry Ordway to write a storyline that would again retool the Shazam! franchise. In the story, Marvel is ambushed by Black Adam and Isis, who are intent on taking over the Rock of Eternity. Isis robs Marvel of his powers by saying Shazam from a spell book to send lightning at him, and banishes a powerless Billy Batson back to Fawcett City, where he contacts the Justice Society for help.[1] Upon arriving at the Rock of Eternity with Billy, the Justice Society fights Black Adam and Isis.[2] Billy is abducted by the now evil Mary Marvel, who shares her powers with him and turns him into an evil teenage Captain Marvel. The evil Billy and Mary join Adam and Isis in fighting the Justice Society. However, Adam switches sides when Isis sets into action her plan to kill off humanity and destroy modern civilization. With the help of the Justice Society's Flash and the spirit of C.C Batson (Mary and Billy's father), the dead wizard Shazam's soul is retrieved from an underworld realm known as the Rock of Finality, and Adam gives up his powers to resurrect him from the statue he is imprisoned in. Shazam promptly takes his powers back from the other three Black Marvels, turns Adam and Isis into stone statues, and banishes Billy and Mary from the Rock of Eternity upon stating that they have failed him. He threatens to come after Freddy Freeman, as his powers come directly from the Gods.[3] They are later seen walking the streets of Fawcett City while homeless and pondering the fate of their father's spirit. Blackest Night During Blackest Night, they are living in an apartment, and comment on how scary it is not to have their powers anymore.[4] Shazam One-Shot Freddy is seen with Billy and Mary in their apartment. They reminisce about the past and how Mary now feels useless without her powers. Mary is later seen assaulting Freddy, Blaze appears. The scene cuts to a homeless shelter. Blaze is seen talking to Mary. She tells Mary that if she kills Freddy, she will restore Billy and Mary's powers. It cuts back. Blaze is seen breaking her promise to Mary. Seconds later the word 'Shazam' is heard, sending Blaze rocketing through the wall. It turns out Freddy was in on it too, only pretending to get killed. Blaze and Freddy fight in the streets. Blaze punches Freddy with a ring containing liquid from the river of the Styx, which is toxic to everyone besides the residents of Hell. Billy is seen telling Mary to distract Blaze while he helps Freddy wash off the toxic water. Freddy then follows by "killing" Blaze and sending her back to Hell. Later on, Freddy tells Billy and Mary that no matter what, he will find a way to restore their powers! Billy and his sister Mary were separated following the death of their parents and left in the care of their uncle Ebenezer. Tragically, Ebenezer threw Billy out and stole his trust fund. Left penniless and homeless, Billy struggled through a sorrowful existence in Fawcett City, finding work as a newsboy. For shelter, he often slept in the subway terminals. One night, a mysterious stranger - later revealed to be the spirit of Billy's father - convinced Billy to follow him deep into the subway tunnels. There, Billy found a marvelous train decorated in strange hieroglyphics and mystic runes. Billy and the stranger rode the train deep into the bowels of the earth and arrived in a looming cavern that held grotesque statues symbolizing the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man. These enemies include Envy, Lust, Greed, Pride, Wrath, Sloth, and Gluttony. Their, Billy met the ancient wizard Shazam, a champion of mankind for thousands of years. Withered with age, Shazam sat on a throne poised ominously beneath a massive stone block suspended above as if by magic. The ancient wizard revealed that he had selected Billy to be his champion to fight for good as the "strongest and mightiest man in the world--Captain Marvel!" The great Wizard Shazam ordered Billy to speak his name, a thunderous Bolt of lighting exploded in the dark cavern and revealed the almighty form of Captain Marvel! S - for the endless wisdom of Solomon H - for the legendary strength of Hercules A - for the stamina and might of Atlas Z - for the overwhelming power of Zeus A - for the courage and invulnerability of Achilles M - for the peerless speed and power of flight of the god Mercury With that, the Wizard Shazam was immediately killed as the large granite block fell from above his throne. Billy vowed to fulfill his singular role. Whenever he needed advice, Billy lit a brazier near Shazam's throne, summoning the wizard's ghost. Marvel's first call to duty was saving the world from the evil mad scientist, Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana, who threatened to silence radio forever unless he was paid a large sum of money. Resuming his regular form, Billy told WHIZ radio mogul Sterling Morris that he could stop the Radio Silencer and Sivana; a disbelieving Morris offered Billy a job on the air if he could do so. After finding the crooks' hideout, Billy transformed into Captain Marvel, destroyed Sivana's radio silencing machine and apprehended his henchmen. Sivana escaped, setting the stage for a long line of future confrontations. Marvel transformed back into Billy, who presented the captured criminals and destroyed Radio Silencer to Sterling Morris. True to his word, Sterling Morris made Billy an on-air news reporter for WHIZ radio. Through his adventures, he soon gained a host of enemies, including Adolf Hitler's champion Captain Nazi, an older Egyptian renegade Marvel called Black Adam, an evil magic-powered brute named Ibac, and an artificially intelligent nuclear-powered robot called Mister Atom. The most notorious Captain Marvel villains, however, were the nefarious Mister Mind and his Monster Society Of Evil, which recruited several of Marvel's previous adversaries. In the early 1940s, Captain Marvel also gained allies in The Marvel Family, a collective of superheroes with similar powers and costumes to Captain Marvel's (by comparison, Superman spin-off character Superboy first appeared in 1944, while Supergirl first appeared in 1959). Early on marked the debut of the Lieutenant Marvels, the alter egos of three other boys who found that, by saying "Shazam!" in unison, they too could become Marvels. Soon a friend named Freddy Freeman, mortally wounded by an attack from Captain Nazi, was given the power to become teenage boy superhero Captain Marvel, Jr.. Eventually Billy and Freddy met Billy's long-lost twin sister Mary Bromfield, who discovered she could, by saying the magic word "Shazam", become teenage superheroine Mary Marvel. The first post-Crisis appearance of Captain Marvel was in the 1986 Legends miniseries. In 1987, Captain Marvel appeared as a member of the Justice League. That same year, he was also given his own miniseries, Shazam! The New Beginning. With the four-issue miniseries, writers Roy and Dann Thomas and artist Tom Mandrake attempted to re-launch the Captain Marvel mythos and bring the wizard Shazam, Doctor Sivana, Uncle Dudley, and Black Adam into the modern DC Universe with an altered origin story. In this miniseries, both Sivana and Dudley were Billy Batson's real uncles, who fought over the custody for the boy after his parents were killed (by Sivana) in a car accident. Black Adam is also present in the story as Sivana's partner in crime. The most notable change that Thomas and Justice League writers Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis introduced into the Captain Marvel mythos was that the personality of young Billy Batson is retained when he transforms into the Captain (classic-era comics tended to treat Captain Marvel and Billy as two separate personalities). This change would remain for all future appearances of the character as justification for his sunny, Golden-Age personality in the darker modern-day comic book world. (Captain Marvel's Justice League teammate Guy Gardner often jokingly referred to the innocent, pure-hearted Captain as "Captain Whitebread"). Another notable change in this version was the relocation of the Shazam characters from Fawcett City to San Francisco. The Power of Shazam In this version of the story, Billy's parents - archaeologists C. C. and Marylin Batson - were killed by their treacherous assistant, Theo Adam, while on a dig at the tomb of Rameses II at Abu Simbel, Egypt. Theo Adam was the resurrected non-powered form of Teth-Adam aka Black Adam. He also kidnaps Billy's sister Mary, who ends up missing. The wizard Shazam is made aware of all of these events, and (just as in the Fawcett origin) has Billy brought before him by the dark-clothed stranger, and grants the boy the power to become Captain Marvel. As Captain Marvel, Billy takes on the form of his late father, which is how Theo Adam guesses his identity, has a revelation about the power of Shazam, and becomes Black Adam using a scarab he stole from the tomb. After subduing Black Adam and his employer, the rich tycoon Doctor Sivana, Billy swears to find his sister as Captain Marvel. Captain Marvel became a member of the revived Justice Society of America and was featured prominently in that group alongside his nemesis Black Adam. Captain Marvel had originally joined the team to keep an eye on Adam, who had joined the JSA claiming to have reformed. Black Adam eventually left the JSA to instigate a takeover of his home country of Kahndaq; he had a fondness for the country, and wished to see the totalitarian regime done away with, in what he saw as justice. Captain Marvel remained with the team. During his tenure in the JSA, Marvel dated Courtney Whitmore, also known as Stargirl, which put him in an unusual position; while he could legally date Courtney as Billy Batson, it looked very strange for the grown-up Captain Marvel to be with the teenaged Stargirl. The Golden Age Flash, Jay Garrick, another JSA member, confronted Marvel about the issue. Rather than telling Garrick and the team the truth about his age, Marvel chose to follow the Wisdom of Solomon and leave the team and Courtney. Captain Marvel transforms into Marvel. Art by Howard Porter. Added by CleverGuyThe Marvel Family played an integral part the Infinite Crisis. The climax of the Day of Vengeance saw the Spectre engaged in a cosmic-level battle with the wizard Shazam. At the conclusion of this battle, Shazam was obliterated, and the Rock of Eternity burst apart into Earth's dimension, freeing scores of ancient magicks and evils that had been captured eons ago back into the Universe. In a later Day of Vengeance one-shot special, Captain Marvel and the Marvel Family then helped Zatanna and several other beings to capture the Seven Deadly Sins and rebuild the Rock of Eternity. Captain Marvel was then required to take over Shazam's role as caretaker of the Rock. Marvel was later shown fulfilling this role, although teetering on the brink of insanity, constantly talking back to the Seven Sins around him. During this time, Marvel was shown helping Black Adam grant Adrianna Tomaz the powers of the goddess Isis. Later that year, Captain Marvel presided at the marriage ceremony of Adam and Isis in Kahndaq. Black Adam's continued attempts to reform, and depicted Adam's formation of, with Captain Marvel's blessing, a "Black Marvel Family". Joining Black Adam in the Black Marvel Family were his wife Isis and her brother Osiris. Isis and Osiris are murdered by the "Four Horsemen", creatures engineered by a team of DC's mad scientist characters (Dr. Sivana among them). As a result, Black Adam takes his revenge out on the entire world, killing millions. Black Adam is halted for a few minutes, just the time needed for Captain Marvel to force a magic lightning bolt on him, turning Black Adam back to Teth-Adam and changing his magic word into an unknown one. The Trials of Shazam! and Final Crisis The Trials of Shazam!, a 12-issue maxi-series written by Judd Winick and illustrated by Howard Porter for the first eight issues and by Mauro Cascioli for the remaining four, began publication in August 2006. The series redefined the Shazam! mythos, the characters, and their place in the DC Universe. Trials of Shazam! featured Captain Marvel, now with a white costume and long white hair, taking over the role of the wizard Shazam under the name Marvel, while Captain Marvel Jr. and Mary Marvel lose their powers. A powerless Freddy Freeman is then drafted to prove himself worthy to the individual six gods evident in the "Shazam" acronym so that he can become their new champion and herald under the name Shazam, although a witch Sabina from the Council of Merlin attempts to take the power herself, as ordered by her father Merlin. Atlas is killed during the series by Sabina, but Apollo's healing replaces him. Marvel helps Freddy when he is trapped by the weight that Atlas bore. In the pages of the 2007-2008 Countdown to Final Crisis limited series, Black Adam gives the powerless Mary Batson his powers, turning her into a more villainous character. She eventually relinquishes the power and gets powers from the Olympians, but she is tempted by her old power. By the end of the series, as well as in DC's 2008-2009 Final Crisis limited series, the now black-costumed Mary Marvel, possessed by the evil New God DeSaad, becomes a villain, joining forces with Superman villain Darkseid and fighting both Supergirl and Freddy Freeman/Shazam, who turns her back using his lightning. Justice Society of America The redesigned Marvel made a few appearances in various DC comics outside of The Trials of Shazam! maxi-series for two years before returning in Justice Society of America (vol. 3) #23 in January 2009. Justice Society writer Geoff Johns collaborated with writer/artist Jerry Ordway to write a storyline that would again retool the Shazam! franchise. In the story, Marvel is ambushed by Black Adam and Isis, who are intent on taking over the Rock of Eternity. Isis robs Marvel of his powers by saying Shazam from a spell book to send lightning at him, and banishes a powerless Billy Batson back to Fawcett City, where he contacts the Justice Society for help. Upon arriving at the Rock of Eternity with Billy, the Justice Society fights Black Adam and Isis. Billy is abducted by the now evil Mary Marvel, who shares her powers with him and turns him into an evil teenage Captain Marvel. The evil Billy and Mary join Adam and Isis in fighting the Justice Society. However, Adam switches sides when Isis sets into action her plan to kill off humanity and destroy modern civilization. With the help of the Justice Society's Flash and the spirit of C.C Batson (Mary and Billy's father), the dead wizard Shazam's soul is retrieved from an underworld realm known as the Rock of Finality, and Adam gives up his powers to resurrect him from the statue he is imprisoned in. Shazam promptly takes his powers back from the other three Black Marvels, turns Adam and Isis into stone statues, and banishes Billy and Mary from the Rock of Eternity upon stating that they have failed him. He threatens to come after Freddy Freeman, as his powers come directly from the Gods. They are later seen walking the streets of Fawcett City while homeless and pondering the fate of their father's spirit. Blackest Night During Blackest Night, they are living in an apartment, and comment on how scary it is not to have their powers anymore. Shazam One-Shot Freddy is seen with Billy and Mary in their apartment. They reminisce about the past and how Mary now feels useless without her powers. Mary is later seen assaulting Freddy, Blaze appears. The scene cuts to a homeless shelter. Blaze is seen talking to Mary. She tells Mary that if she kills Freddy, she will restore Billy and Mary's powers. It cuts back. Blaze is seen breaking her promise to Mary. Seconds later the word 'Shazam' is heard, sending Blaze rocketing through the wall. It turns out Freddy was in on it too, only pretending to get killed. Blaze and Freddy fight in the streets. Blaze punches Freddy with a ring containing liquid from the river of the Styx, which is toxic to everyone besides the residents of Hell. Billy is seen telling Mary to distract Blaze while he helps Freddy wash off the toxic water. Freddy then follows by "killing" Blaze and sending her back to Hell. Later on, Freddy tells Billy and Mary that no matter what, he will find a way to restore their powers!
2011-05-21 06:13:40 Shadow303030 Bio
What the heck is Earth-S?
When DC comics bought the Fawcett line of characters, they faced a problem. How would they explain where these characters were during the time that the Justice Society of America defended the Earth? How could it be that Captain Marvel and Superman never met up in the well-chronicled fight against Nazi Germany? Why wasn't Captain Marvel, Jr. or Mary Marvel one of the original Teen Titans? Why didn't Lex Luthor and Dr. Sivana travel in the same social circles? Wouldn't world-class scientist Jim Barr (aka "Bulletman") have at some time crossed paths with innovators Bruce Wayne or Lex Luthor or at least Ted Kord?

The answer DC came up with for all these questions was that the Fawcett characters lived on a completely different Earth called Earth-S.

Now, to be sure, Earth-S is a bit of retro-continuity. You'll find no mention of Earth-S in the pages of Bulletman or Master Comics or even The Marvel Family.

However, DC did establish a narrative link between their use of the characters and Fawcett's. That link came in the pages of Shazam #1. In a story entitled, "The World's Wickedest Plan" writer Denny O'Neill and Captain Marvel co-creator C.C. Beck connected the stories told in the Golden Age by Fawcett to those told in the Silver and Bronze by DC.

What happened, they said, was that just after the conclusion of the last Fawcett story, Dr. Sivana trapped virtually every Fawcett character (including himself) in a "Suspendium globe" that preserved everyone for two decades in suspended animation. When they awoke, they all were the same apparent age as they had been when Fawcett stopped publishing super hero comics. And, just as soon as it was established that we were witnessing a story involving the same characters that had thrived in the 1940s, DC slipped in the notion of them all being on Earth-S.

Thus, the phrase "of Earth-S" that appears after the names of many characters in this database describes their use from their Golden Age introductions at Fawcett to their demise when Earth-S was destroyed consequent to DC"s Crisis on Infinite Earths.


The origin of Captain Marvel
Alone and on the streets of a major metropolitan city, orphaned newsboy Billy Batson was led into an abandoned subway tunnel by a mysterious stranger. On an out-of-service rail-track an odd and driverless subway car stopped to pick-up Billy and his companion. Following a brief trip, Billy and the stranger disembarked the train and walked down a ancient hallway. On one side of the cavernous hall grotesque statues of the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man: Pride, Envy, Greed, Hatred, Selfishness, Laziness and Injustice loomed. As mysteriously as he appeared the stranger vanishes. Sitting on a throne at the far-end of the hall is a wizened old man with long white hair and a full, almost floor-length white beard. At the old man’s beckoning, Billy steps forward and stops in front of the throne. The old man announces himself by proclaiming, "I am Shazam!," amid a peal of thunder and flash of lightning. As the smoke clears Billy notices the wall behind the wizard is inscribed with the names of six great elders which together form the name SHAZAM: Solomon- wisdom, Hercules - strength, Atlas - stamina, Zeus - power, Achilles - Courage, and Mercury - speed. Shazam relates to the young boy that he needs a new champion to battle evil and that he has chosen Billy. "Speak my name" shouts Shazam! As Billy shouts the name of the ancient wizard, lightning drops from the ceiling of the chamber striking him, while at the same time a deafening peal of thunder echoes off the cavern walls. As the smoke clears, Billy discovers that he has been transformed into a man! "Captain Marvel, I salute you," says Shazam! At that moment a slab of stone hanging above Shazam’s head, held in place by a tattered thread, crashes down onto the old wizard crushing him. From the dust and rumble a ghostly image of Shazam appears and lights a nearby brazier. At that, Captain Marvel sets off to track down the evil radio silencer plaguing his fair city — and at that Captain Marvel meets his arch-nemesis for the first time: Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana!
Billy and his sister Mary were separated following the death of their parents and left in the care of their uncle Ebenezer. Tragically, Ebenezer threw Billy out and stole his trust fund. Left penniless and homeless, Billy struggled through a sorrowful existence in Fawcett City, finding work as a newsboy. For shelter, he often slept in the subway terminals. One night, a mysterious stranger - later revealed to be the spirit of Billy's father - convinced Billy to follow him deep into the subway tunnels. There, Billy found a marvelous train decorated in strange hieroglyphics and mystic runes. Billy and the stranger rode the train deep into the bowels of the earth and arrived in a looming cavern that held grotesque statues symbolizing the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man. These enemies include Envy, Lust, Greed, Pride, Wrath, Sloth, and Gluttony. Their, Billy met the ancient wizard Shazam, a champion of mankind for thousands of years. Withered with age, Shazam sat on a throne poised ominously beneath a massive stone block suspended above as if by magic. The ancient wizard revealed that he had selected Billy to be his champion to fight for good as the "strongest and mightiest man in the world--Captain Marvel!" The great Wizard Shazam ordered Billy to speak his name, a thunderous Bolt of lighting exploded in the dark cavern and revealed the almighty form of Captain Marvel! S - for the endless wisdom of Solomon H - for the legendary strength of Hercules A - for the stamina and might of Atlas Z - for the overwhelming power of Zeus A - for the courage and invulnerability of Achilles M - for the peerless speed and power of flight of the god Mercury With that, the Wizard Shazam was immediately killed as the large granite block fell from above his throne. Billy vowed to fulfill his singular role. Whenever he needed advice, Billy lit a brazier near Shazam's throne, summoning the wizard's ghost. Marvel's first call to duty was saving the world from the evil mad scientist, Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana, who threatened to silence radio forever unless he was paid a large sum of money. Resuming his regular form, Billy told WHIZ radio mogul Sterling Morris that he could stop the Radio Silencer and Sivana; a disbelieving Morris offered Billy a job on the air if he could do so. After finding the crooks' hideout, Billy transformed into Captain Marvel, destroyed Sivana's radio silencing machine and apprehended his henchmen. Sivana escaped, setting the stage for a long line of future confrontations. Marvel transformed back into Billy, who presented the captured criminals and destroyed Radio Silencer to Sterling Morris. True to his word, Sterling Morris made Billy an on-air news reporter for WHIZ radio. Through his adventures, he soon gained a host of enemies, including Adolf Hitler's champion Captain Nazi, an older Egyptian renegade Marvel called Black Adam, an evil magic-powered brute named Ibac, and an artificially intelligent nuclear-powered robot called Mister Atom. The most notorious Captain Marvel villains, however, were the nefarious Mister Mind and his Monster Society Of Evil, which recruited several of Marvel's previous adversaries. In the early 1940s, Captain Marvel also gained allies in The Marvel Family, a collective of superheroes with similar powers and costumes to Captain Marvel's (by comparison, Superman spin-off character Superboy first appeared in 1944, while Supergirl first appeared in 1959). Early on marked the debut of the Lieutenant Marvels, the alter egos of three other boys who found that, by saying "Shazam!" in unison, they too could become Marvels. Soon a friend named Freddy Freeman, mortally wounded by an attack from Captain Nazi, was given the power to become teenage boy superhero Captain Marvel, Jr.. Eventually Billy and Freddy met Billy's long-lost twin sister Mary Bromfield, who discovered she could, by saying the magic word "Shazam", become teenage superheroine Mary Marvel. The first post-Crisis appearance of Captain Marvel was in the 1986 Legends miniseries. In 1987, Captain Marvel appeared as a member of the Justice League. That same year, he was also given his own miniseries, Shazam! The New Beginning. With the four-issue miniseries, writers Roy and Dann Thomas and artist Tom Mandrake attempted to re-launch the Captain Marvel mythos and bring the wizard Shazam, Doctor Sivana, Uncle Dudley, and Black Adam into the modern DC Universe with an altered origin story. In this miniseries, both Sivana and Dudley were Billy Batson's real uncles, who fought over the custody for the boy after his parents were killed (by Sivana) in a car accident. Black Adam is also present in the story as Sivana's partner in crime. The most notable change that Thomas and Justice League writers Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis introduced into the Captain Marvel mythos was that the personality of young Billy Batson is retained when he transforms into the Captain (classic-era comics tended to treat Captain Marvel and Billy as two separate personalities). This change would remain for all future appearances of the character as justification for his sunny, Golden-Age personality in the darker modern-day comic book world. (Captain Marvel's Justice League teammate Guy Gardner often jokingly referred to the innocent, pure-hearted Captain as "Captain Whitebread"). Another notable change in this version was the relocation of the Shazam characters from Fawcett City to San Francisco. The Power of Shazam In this version of the story, Billy's parents - archaeologists C. C. and Marylin Batson - were killed by their treacherous assistant, Theo Adam, while on a dig at the tomb of Rameses II at Abu Simbel, Egypt. Theo Adam was the resurrected non-powered form of Teth-Adam aka Black Adam. He also kidnaps Billy's sister Mary, who ends up missing. The wizard Shazam is made aware of all of these events, and (just as in the Fawcett origin) has Billy brought before him by the dark-clothed stranger, and grants the boy the power to become Captain Marvel. As Captain Marvel, Billy takes on the form of his late father, which is how Theo Adam guesses his identity, has a revelation about the power of Shazam, and becomes Black Adam using a scarab he stole from the tomb. After subduing Black Adam and his employer, the rich tycoon Doctor Sivana, Billy swears to find his sister as Captain Marvel. Captain Marvel became a member of the revived Justice Society of America and was featured prominently in that group alongside his nemesis Black Adam. Captain Marvel had originally joined the team to keep an eye on Adam, who had joined the JSA claiming to have reformed. Black Adam eventually left the JSA to instigate a takeover of his home country of Kahndaq; he had a fondness for the country, and wished to see the totalitarian regime done away with, in what he saw as justice. Captain Marvel remained with the team. During his tenure in the JSA, Marvel dated Courtney Whitmore, also known as Stargirl, which put him in an unusual position; while he could legally date Courtney as Billy Batson, it looked very strange for the grown-up Captain Marvel to be with the teenaged Stargirl. The Golden Age Flash, Jay Garrick, another JSA member, confronted Marvel about the issue. Rather than telling Garrick and the team the truth about his age, Marvel chose to follow the Wisdom of Solomon and leave the team and Courtney. Captain Marvel transforms into Marvel. Art by Howard Porter. Added by CleverGuyThe Marvel Family played an integral part the Infinite Crisis. The climax of the Day of Vengeance saw the Spectre engaged in a cosmic-level battle with the wizard Shazam. At the conclusion of this battle, Shazam was obliterated, and the Rock of Eternity burst apart into Earth's dimension, freeing scores of ancient magicks and evils that had been captured eons ago back into the Universe. In a later Day of Vengeance one-shot special, Captain Marvel and the Marvel Family then helped Zatanna and several other beings to capture the Seven Deadly Sins and rebuild the Rock of Eternity. Captain Marvel was then required to take over Shazam's role as caretaker of the Rock. Marvel was later shown fulfilling this role, although teetering on the brink of insanity, constantly talking back to the Seven Sins around him. During this time, Marvel was shown helping Black Adam grant Adrianna Tomaz the powers of the goddess Isis. Later that year, Captain Marvel presided at the marriage ceremony of Adam and Isis in Kahndaq. Black Adam's continued attempts to reform, and depicted Adam's formation of, with Captain Marvel's blessing, a "Black Marvel Family". Joining Black Adam in the Black Marvel Family were his wife Isis and her brother Osiris. Isis and Osiris are murdered by the "Four Horsemen", creatures engineered by a team of DC's mad scientist characters (Dr. Sivana among them). As a result, Black Adam takes his revenge out on the entire world, killing millions. Black Adam is halted for a few minutes, just the time needed for Captain Marvel to force a magic lightning bolt on him, turning Black Adam back to Teth-Adam and changing his magic word into an unknown one. The Trials of Shazam! and Final Crisis The Trials of Shazam!, a 12-issue maxi-series written by Judd Winick and illustrated by Howard Porter for the first eight issues and by Mauro Cascioli for the remaining four, began publication in August 2006. The series redefined the Shazam! mythos, the characters, and their place in the DC Universe. Trials of Shazam! featured Captain Marvel, now with a white costume and long white hair, taking over the role of the wizard Shazam under the name Marvel, while Captain Marvel Jr. and Mary Marvel lose their powers. A powerless Freddy Freeman is then drafted to prove himself worthy to the individual six gods evident in the "Shazam" acronym so that he can become their new champion and herald under the name Shazam, although a witch Sabina from the Council of Merlin attempts to take the power herself, as ordered by her father Merlin. Atlas is killed during the series by Sabina, but Apollo's healing replaces him. Marvel helps Freddy when he is trapped by the weight that Atlas bore. In the pages of the 2007-2008 Countdown to Final Crisis limited series, Black Adam gives the powerless Mary Batson his powers, turning her into a more villainous character. She eventually relinquishes the power and gets powers from the Olympians, but she is tempted by her old power. By the end of the series, as well as in DC's 2008-2009 Final Crisis limited series, the now black-costumed Mary Marvel, possessed by the evil New God DeSaad, becomes a villain, joining forces with Superman villain Darkseid and fighting both Supergirl and Freddy Freeman/Shazam, who turns her back using his lightning. Justice Society of America The redesigned Marvel made a few appearances in various DC comics outside of The Trials of Shazam! maxi-series for two years before returning in Justice Society of America (vol. 3) #23 in January 2009. Justice Society writer Geoff Johns collaborated with writer/artist Jerry Ordway to write a storyline that would again retool the Shazam! franchise. In the story, Marvel is ambushed by Black Adam and Isis, who are intent on taking over the Rock of Eternity. Isis robs Marvel of his powers by saying Shazam from a spell book to send lightning at him, and banishes a powerless Billy Batson back to Fawcett City, where he contacts the Justice Society for help.[1] Upon arriving at the Rock of Eternity with Billy, the Justice Society fights Black Adam and Isis.[2] Billy is abducted by the now evil Mary Marvel, who shares her powers with him and turns him into an evil teenage Captain Marvel. The evil Billy and Mary join Adam and Isis in fighting the Justice Society. However, Adam switches sides when Isis sets into action her plan to kill off humanity and destroy modern civilization. With the help of the Justice Society's Flash and the spirit of C.C Batson (Mary and Billy's father), the dead wizard Shazam's soul is retrieved from an underworld realm known as the Rock of Finality, and Adam gives up his powers to resurrect him from the statue he is imprisoned in. Shazam promptly takes his powers back from the other three Black Marvels, turns Adam and Isis into stone statues, and banishes Billy and Mary from the Rock of Eternity upon stating that they have failed him. He threatens to come after Freddy Freeman, as his powers come directly from the Gods.[3] They are later seen walking the streets of Fawcett City while homeless and pondering the fate of their father's spirit. Blackest Night During Blackest Night, they are living in an apartment, and comment on how scary it is not to have their powers anymore.[4] Shazam One-Shot Freddy is seen with Billy and Mary in their apartment. They reminisce about the past and how Mary now feels useless without her powers. Mary is later seen assaulting Freddy, Blaze appears. The scene cuts to a homeless shelter. Blaze is seen talking to Mary. She tells Mary that if she kills Freddy, she will restore Billy and Mary's powers. It cuts back. Blaze is seen breaking her promise to Mary. Seconds later the word 'Shazam' is heard, sending Blaze rocketing through the wall. It turns out Freddy was in on it too, only pretending to get killed. Blaze and Freddy fight in the streets. Blaze punches Freddy with a ring containing liquid from the river of the Styx, which is toxic to everyone besides the residents of Hell. Billy is seen telling Mary to distract Blaze while he helps Freddy wash off the toxic water. Freddy then follows by "killing" Blaze and sending her back to Hell. Later on, Freddy tells Billy and Mary that no matter what, he will find a way to restore their powers!
2011-05-21 06:05:47 Shadow303030 Powers When Billy Batson says the magic word "Shazam!" and transforms into Captain Marvel, he is granted the following powers: S for the wisdom of Solomon As Captain Marvel, Billy has instant access to a vast amount of scholarly knowledge, including most known languages and sciences. He has exceptional photographic recall and mental acuity allowing him to read and decipher hieroglyphics, recall everything he has ever learned and solve long mathematical equations. He also has a great understanding of divine phenomenon in the mortal world. The wisdom of Solomon also provides him with counsel and advice in times of need. In early Captain Marvel stories, Solomon's power also gave Marvel the ability to hypnotize people. (Solomon is the only figure in the list not taken from Greco-Roman mythology.) H for the strength of Hercules* Hercules' power grants Captain Marvel immense superhuman strength, making him one of DC Comics' most physically powerful characters; he is able to easily bend steel, punch through walls, and lift massive objects, (including whole continents like South America). In the comics, this strength has evolved in parallel to that of Superman. A for the stamina of Atlas Using Atlas' stamina, Captain Marvel can withstand and survive most types of extreme physical assaults, and heal from them. Additionally, he does not need to eat, sleep, or breathe and can survive unaided in space when in Captain Marvel form. Pre-Crisis, it was implied in some stories to give him invulnerability. Z for the power of Zeus Zeus' power, besides fueling the magic thunderbolt that transforms Captain Marvel, also enhances Marvel's other physical and mental abilities, and grants him resistance against all magic spells and attacks. Marvel can use the lightning bolt as a weapon by dodging it and allowing it to strike an opponent or target. The magic lightning has several uses, such as creating apparatus, restoring damage done to Marvel, and acting as fuel for magic spells. If Billy is poisoned, for example, transforming will enable him to survive.(Captain Marvel Adventures #8) Pre-Crisis it was claimed in some stories to give him invulnerabilty.[26]It can also turn other Marvels back by striking them. It aids interdimensional travel at the Rock of Eternity. A for the courage of Achilles This aspect gives Captain Marvel the courage of Achilles, giving him bravery and in one story it is claimed to give him fighting skills. In the Trials of Shazam! mini-series, this was changed to Achilles' near invulnerability. It also aids Captain Marvel's mental fortitude against most mental attacks. M for the speed of Mercury By channeling Mercury's speed, Captain Marvel can move at superhuman speeds and fly, although in older comics he could only leap great distances. This also gives Marvel the ability to fly to the Rock of Eternity by flying faster than the speed of light.
2009-12-02 22:25:01 Cononach Alias Captain Marvel (DC ) (01 - Earth-S) Captain Marvel (DC) (01 - Earth-S)
2009-12-02 22:24:15 Cononach Alias Captain Marvel (Earth-S) Captain Marvel (DC ) (01 - Earth-S)
2007-10-18 10:31:21 dalecooper Alias Captain Marvel of Earth-S Captain Marvel (Earth-S)
2006-09-01 13:50:06 DarthSkeptical Notes
The Trial of Superman
In 1941, DC (or, technically, National Comics Publications) entered litigation against Fawcett for copyright infringement. They alleged that Captain Marvel was just a bit too close to Superman for comfort. The case drug on for a decade. In 1951, Fawcett appeared to have won, with the judge declaring that, while Captain Marvel was in concept an illegal derivation of Superman, DC had not defended its copyrights vigorously enough. The McClure Syndicate, responsible for some of the Superman newspaper strip syndication, had failed to properly copyright their use of the Superman character.

Thus DC appealed, asking the courts a simple question: if we license Superman to another party, and they don't copyright their original Superman stories, do we really lose our copyright on Superman? The appellate judge answered with a resounding no. He struck down the earlier verdict, while upholding the trial judge's opinion that, conceptually, Captain Marvel and Superman were too similar. "The evidence," he wrote, "leaves no possible doubt that the copying was deliberate; indeed it takes scarcely more than a glance at corresponding strips of Superman and Captain Marvel, to assure the observer that the plagiarism was deliberate and unabashed."

Before awarding damages, however, the judge was presented with an out-of-court settlement between the two companies. Sensing by now that the steam was out of the super hero business, Fawcett agreed to cease publication of its comics, and paid $400,000 to DC.

Though barred by this agreement from printing new Captain Marvel material, they did retain a level of copyright. When DC revived the characters in 1973's Shazam!, they ironically had to license them from Fawcett. In 1980, long after the Shazam! revival had died a quiet death, DC bought the Fawcett characters outright—just in time to kill off the Earth-S concept in 1985's Crisis.


The power of Shazam
It's worth pointing out that the reason for DC's lawsuit was less about creative violation than it was commercial survival. During the mid-1940s Captain Marvel was the most popular comics character in America. Captain Marvel Adventures sold well over 10 million copies annually at the time.

Superman, DC's most popular character, was getting left behind. So DC (or, if you prefer, National) turned to a motto they'd used successfully before: if you can't beat 'em in the marketplace, you take 'em to court.


The Trial of Superman
In 1941, DC (or, technically, National Comics Publications) entered litigation against Fawcett for copyright infringement. They alleged that Captain Marvel was just a bit too close to Superman for comfort. The case drug on for a decade. In 1951, Fawcett appeared to have won, with the judge declaring that, while Captain Marvel strips were illegally derivative of Superman, DC had not defended its copyrights vigorously enough. The McClure Syndicate, responsible for some of the Superman newspaper strip syndication, had failed to properly copyright their use of the Superman character.

Thus DC appealed, asking the courts a simple question: if we license Superman to another party, and they don't copyright their original Superman stories, do we really lose our copyright on Superman? The appellate judge answered with a resounding no. He struck down the earlier verdict, while upholding the trial judge's opinion that Captain Marvel and Superman strips were too similar. "The evidence," he wrote, "leaves no possible doubt that the copying was deliberate; indeed it takes scarcely more than a glance at corresponding strips of Superman and Captain Marvel, to assure the observer that the plagiarism was deliberate and unabashed."

[It is important to note that both the trial and appellate judges were basing this decision upon the content of the stories, and how those stories reflected upon an assessment of their star characters. Thus, while we might today think that there are really a lot of differences between the abstract concepts of Superman and Captain Marvel, a frame-by-frame comparison of early Captain Marvel stories vs. early Superman ones presents a different conclusion. Many of the stories and situations are indeed quite similar, given that both feature wide-eyed, innocent reporters, mad scientist super-nemesises, and an almost identical display of super-heroics.]

Before awarding damages, however, the judge was presented with an out-of-court settlement between the two companies. Sensing by now that the steam was out of the super hero business, Fawcett agreed to cease publication of its comics, and paid $400,000 to DC.

Though barred by this agreement from printing new Captain Marvel material, they did retain a level of copyright. When DC revived the characters in 1973's Shazam!, they ironically had to license them from Fawcett. In 1980, long after the Shazam! revival had died a quiet death, DC bought the Fawcett characters outright—just in time to kill off the Earth-S concept in 1985's Crisis.


The power of Shazam
It's worth pointing out that DC's lawsuit was undoubtedly made more urgent by Captain Marvel's commercial success. It would probably be unfair to say that this was the only reason, as DC had entered similar litigation against characters like Wonderman and Fawcett's own Master Man, who had not built up any significant success before being slapped with a cease and desist order. (Wonderman, for instance, had only one issue to his name before a lawsuit was filed.)

Nevertheless it is slightly curious that DC allowed Captain Marvel to be published for over a year before attempting to fight him. [A cease and desist order was delivered to Fawcett in June 1941; the lawsuit was filed in September 1941.]

By that time, Captain Marvel had fully begun to show signs of eclipsing Superman. Fawcett in no way, therefore, obeyed the cease and desist order they'd been given. Thus, for the entirety of the legal action, they continued publishing Captain Marvel stories, greatly expanding his universe, and his profits, as the wheels of justice creaked along. By the mid-1940s Captain Marvel was the most popular comics character in America. Captain Marvel Adventures sold well over 10 million copies annually at the time.

Superman, DC's most popular character, was getting left behind.

Why DC waited to sue, therefore, is an interesting question to which we might never quite know the answer. What is certain, though, is that it was a costly delay that DC has yet to really recover from the character. As of 2006, he has never, under DC's complete control, appeared in a live action project, and it took until 1995 for DC to use the character in a way that received any serious acclaim. Even so, the majority of the money historically made on the character has so far resided in Fawcett's pockets. And a lot of it came directly at the expense of Superman, simply because DC hesitated before going to court.

2006-09-01 13:08:24 DarthSkeptical Notes
The Trial of Superman
In 1941, DC (or, technically, National Comics Publications) entered litigation against Fawcett for copyright infringement. They alleged that Captain Marvel was just a bit too close to Superman for comfort. The case drug on for a decade. In 1951, Fawcett appeared to have won, with the judge declaring that, while Captain Marvel was in concept an illegal derivation of Superman, DC had not defended its copyrights vigorously enough. The McClure Syndicate, responsible for some of the Superman newspaper strip syndication, had failed to properly copyright their use of the Superman character.

Thus DC appealed, asking the courts a simple question: if we license Superman to another party, and they don't copyright their original Superman stories, do we really lose our copyright on Superman? The appellate judge answered with a resounding no. He struck down the earlier verdict, while upholding the trial judge's opinion that, conceptually, Captain Marvel and Superman were too similar.

Before awarding damages, however, the judge was presented with an out-of-court settlement between the two companies. Sensing by now that the steam was out of the super hero business, Fawcett agreed to cease publication of its comics, and paid $400,000 to DC.

Though barred by this agreement from printing new material, they did retain a level of copyright. When DC revived the characters in 1973's Shazam!, they ironically had to license them from Fawcett. In 1980, long after the Shazam! revival had died a quiet death, DC bought the Fawcett characters outright—just in time to kill off the Earth-S concept in 1985's Crisis.


The power of Shazam
It's worth pointing out that the reason for DC's lawsuit was less about creative violation than it was commercial survival. During the mid-1940s Captain Marvel was the most popular comics character in America. Captain Marvel Adventures sold well over 10 million copies annually at the time.

Superman, DC's most popular character, was getting left behind. So DC (or, if you prefer, National) turned to a motto they'd used successfully before: if you can't beat 'em in the marketplace, you take 'em to court.


The Trial of Superman
In 1941, DC (or, technically, National Comics Publications) entered litigation against Fawcett for copyright infringement. They alleged that Captain Marvel was just a bit too close to Superman for comfort. The case drug on for a decade. In 1951, Fawcett appeared to have won, with the judge declaring that, while Captain Marvel was in concept an illegal derivation of Superman, DC had not defended its copyrights vigorously enough. The McClure Syndicate, responsible for some of the Superman newspaper strip syndication, had failed to properly copyright their use of the Superman character.

Thus DC appealed, asking the courts a simple question: if we license Superman to another party, and they don't copyright their original Superman stories, do we really lose our copyright on Superman? The appellate judge answered with a resounding no. He struck down the earlier verdict, while upholding the trial judge's opinion that, conceptually, Captain Marvel and Superman were too similar. "The evidence," he wrote, "leaves no possible doubt that the copying was deliberate; indeed it takes scarcely more than a glance at corresponding strips of Superman and Captain Marvel, to assure the observer that the plagiarism was deliberate and unabashed."

Before awarding damages, however, the judge was presented with an out-of-court settlement between the two companies. Sensing by now that the steam was out of the super hero business, Fawcett agreed to cease publication of its comics, and paid $400,000 to DC.

Though barred by this agreement from printing new Captain Marvel material, they did retain a level of copyright. When DC revived the characters in 1973's Shazam!, they ironically had to license them from Fawcett. In 1980, long after the Shazam! revival had died a quiet death, DC bought the Fawcett characters outright—just in time to kill off the Earth-S concept in 1985's Crisis.


The power of Shazam
It's worth pointing out that the reason for DC's lawsuit was less about creative violation than it was commercial survival. During the mid-1940s Captain Marvel was the most popular comics character in America. Captain Marvel Adventures sold well over 10 million copies annually at the time.

Superman, DC's most popular character, was getting left behind. So DC (or, if you prefer, National) turned to a motto they'd used successfully before: if you can't beat 'em in the marketplace, you take 'em to court.

2006-09-01 12:44:19 DarthSkeptical Notes
The Trial of Superman
In 1941, DC entered litigation against Fawcett for copyright infringement. They alleged that Captain Marvel was just a bit too close to Superman for comfort. The case drug on for a decade. In 1951, Fawcett appeared to have won, with the judge declaring that DC had let some of their Superman newspaper strip copyrights wane. In 1952, however, an appellate judge struck down the earlier verdict, awarding DC the victory. Before awarding damages, however, the judge was presented with an out-of-court settlement between the two companies. Sensing by now that the steam was out of the super hero business, Fawcett agreed to cease publication of its comics, and paid $400,000 to DC.

Though barred by this agreement from printing new material, they did retain a level of copyright. When DC revived the characters in 1973's Shazam!, they ironically had to license them from Fawcett. In 1980, long after the Shazam! revival had died a quiet death, DC bought the Fawcett characters outright—just in time to kill off the Earth-S concept in 1985's Crisis.


Popularity
It's worth pointing out that the reason for DC's lawsuit was less about creative violation than it was commercial survival. During the mid-1940s Captain Marvel was the most popular comics character in America. Captain Marvel Adventures sold well over 10 million copies annually at the time. Superman, DC's most popular character, was getting left behind. So DC (or, if you prefer, National) turned to a motto they'd used successfully before: if you can't beat 'em in the marketplace, you take 'em to court.


The Trial of Superman
In 1941, DC (or, technically, National Comics Publications) entered litigation against Fawcett for copyright infringement. They alleged that Captain Marvel was just a bit too close to Superman for comfort. The case drug on for a decade. In 1951, Fawcett appeared to have won, with the judge declaring that, while Captain Marvel was in concept an illegal derivation of Superman, DC had not defended its copyrights vigorously enough. The McClure Syndicate, responsible for some of the Superman newspaper strip syndication, had failed to properly copyright their use of the Superman character.

Thus DC appealed, asking the courts a simple question: if we license Superman to another party, and they don't copyright their original Superman stories, do we really lose our copyright on Superman? The appellate judge answered with a resounding no. He struck down the earlier verdict, while upholding the trial judge's opinion that, conceptually, Captain Marvel and Superman were too similar.

Before awarding damages, however, the judge was presented with an out-of-court settlement between the two companies. Sensing by now that the steam was out of the super hero business, Fawcett agreed to cease publication of its comics, and paid $400,000 to DC.

Though barred by this agreement from printing new material, they did retain a level of copyright. When DC revived the characters in 1973's Shazam!, they ironically had to license them from Fawcett. In 1980, long after the Shazam! revival had died a quiet death, DC bought the Fawcett characters outright—just in time to kill off the Earth-S concept in 1985's Crisis.


The power of Shazam
It's worth pointing out that the reason for DC's lawsuit was less about creative violation than it was commercial survival. During the mid-1940s Captain Marvel was the most popular comics character in America. Captain Marvel Adventures sold well over 10 million copies annually at the time.

Superman, DC's most popular character, was getting left behind. So DC (or, if you prefer, National) turned to a motto they'd used successfully before: if you can't beat 'em in the marketplace, you take 'em to court.

2006-09-01 12:28:08 DarthSkeptical Bio
What the heck is Earth-S?
When DC comics bought the Fawcett line of characters, they faced a problem. How would they explain where these characters were during the time that the Justice Society of America defended the Earth? How could it be that Captain Marvel and Superman never met up in the well-chronicled fight against Nazi Germany? Why wasn't Captain Marvel, Jr. or Mary Marvel one of the original Teen Titans? Why didn't Lex Luthor and Dr. Sivana travel in the same social circles? Wouldn't world-class scientist Jim Barr (aka "Bulletman") have at some time crossed paths with innovators Bruce Wayne or Lex Luthor or at least Ted Kord?

The answer DC came up with for all these questions was that the Fawcett characters lived on a completely different Earth called Earth-S.

Now, to be sure, Earth-S is a bit of retro-continuity. You'll find no mention of Earth-S in the pages of Bulletman or Master Comics or even The Marvel Family.

However, DC did establish a narrative link between their use of the characters and Fawcett's. That link came in the pages of Shazam #1. In a story entitled, "The World's Wickedest Plan" writer Denny O'Neill and Captain Marvel co-creator C.C. Beck connected the stories told in the Golden Age by Fawcett to those told in the Silver and Bronze by DC.

What happened, they said, was that just after the conclusion of the last Fawcett story, Dr. Sivana trapped virtually every Fawcett character (including himself) in a "Suspendium globe" that preserved everyone for two decades in suspended animation. When they awoke, they all were the same apparent age as they had been when Fawcett closed its doors. And, just as soon as it was established that we were witnessing a story involving the same characters that had thrived in the 1940s, DC slipped in the notion of them all being on Earth-S.

Thus, the phrase "of Earth-S" that appears after the names of many characters in this database describes their use from their Golden Age introductions at Fawcett to their demise when Earth-S was destroyed consequent to DC"s Crisis on Infinite Earths.


The origin of Captain Marvel
Alone and on the streets of a major metropolitan city, orphaned newsboy Billy Batson was led into an abandoned subway tunnel by a mysterious stranger. On an out-of-service rail-track an odd and driverless subway car stopped to pick-up Billy and his companion. Following a brief trip, Billy and the stranger disembarked the train and walked down a ancient hallway. On one side of the cavernous hall grotesque statues of the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man: Pride, Envy, Greed, Hatred, Selfishness, Laziness and Injustice loomed. As mysteriously as he appeared the stranger vanishes. Sitting on a throne at the far-end of the hall is a wizened old man with long white hair and a full, almost floor-length white beard. At the old man’s beckoning, Billy steps forward and stops in front of the throne. The old man announces himself by proclaiming, "I am Shazam!," amid a peal of thunder and flash of lightning. As the smoke clears Billy notices the wall behind the wizard is inscribed with the names of six great elders which together form the name SHAZAM: Solomon- wisdom, Hercules - strength, Atlas - stamina, Zeus - power, Achilles - Courage, and Mercury - speed. Shazam relates to the young boy that he needs a new champion to battle evil and that he has chosen Billy. "Speak my name" shouts Shazam! As Billy shouts the name of the ancient wizard, lightning drops from the ceiling of the chamber striking him, while at the same time a deafening peal of thunder echoes off the cavern walls. As the smoke clears, Billy discovers that he has been transformed into a man! "Captain Marvel, I salute you," says Shazam! At that moment a slab of stone hanging above Shazam’s head, held in place by a tattered thread, crashes down onto the old wizard crushing him. From the dust and rumble a ghostly image of Shazam appears and lights a nearby brazier. At that, Captain Marvel sets off to track down the evil radio silencer plaguing his fair city — and at that Captain Marvel meets his arch-nemesis for the first time: Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana!

What the heck is Earth-S?
When DC comics bought the Fawcett line of characters, they faced a problem. How would they explain where these characters were during the time that the Justice Society of America defended the Earth? How could it be that Captain Marvel and Superman never met up in the well-chronicled fight against Nazi Germany? Why wasn't Captain Marvel, Jr. or Mary Marvel one of the original Teen Titans? Why didn't Lex Luthor and Dr. Sivana travel in the same social circles? Wouldn't world-class scientist Jim Barr (aka "Bulletman") have at some time crossed paths with innovators Bruce Wayne or Lex Luthor or at least Ted Kord?

The answer DC came up with for all these questions was that the Fawcett characters lived on a completely different Earth called Earth-S.

Now, to be sure, Earth-S is a bit of retro-continuity. You'll find no mention of Earth-S in the pages of Bulletman or Master Comics or even The Marvel Family.

However, DC did establish a narrative link between their use of the characters and Fawcett's. That link came in the pages of Shazam #1. In a story entitled, "The World's Wickedest Plan" writer Denny O'Neill and Captain Marvel co-creator C.C. Beck connected the stories told in the Golden Age by Fawcett to those told in the Silver and Bronze by DC.

What happened, they said, was that just after the conclusion of the last Fawcett story, Dr. Sivana trapped virtually every Fawcett character (including himself) in a "Suspendium globe" that preserved everyone for two decades in suspended animation. When they awoke, they all were the same apparent age as they had been when Fawcett stopped publishing super hero comics. And, just as soon as it was established that we were witnessing a story involving the same characters that had thrived in the 1940s, DC slipped in the notion of them all being on Earth-S.

Thus, the phrase "of Earth-S" that appears after the names of many characters in this database describes their use from their Golden Age introductions at Fawcett to their demise when Earth-S was destroyed consequent to DC"s Crisis on Infinite Earths.


The origin of Captain Marvel
Alone and on the streets of a major metropolitan city, orphaned newsboy Billy Batson was led into an abandoned subway tunnel by a mysterious stranger. On an out-of-service rail-track an odd and driverless subway car stopped to pick-up Billy and his companion. Following a brief trip, Billy and the stranger disembarked the train and walked down a ancient hallway. On one side of the cavernous hall grotesque statues of the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man: Pride, Envy, Greed, Hatred, Selfishness, Laziness and Injustice loomed. As mysteriously as he appeared the stranger vanishes. Sitting on a throne at the far-end of the hall is a wizened old man with long white hair and a full, almost floor-length white beard. At the old man’s beckoning, Billy steps forward and stops in front of the throne. The old man announces himself by proclaiming, "I am Shazam!," amid a peal of thunder and flash of lightning. As the smoke clears Billy notices the wall behind the wizard is inscribed with the names of six great elders which together form the name SHAZAM: Solomon- wisdom, Hercules - strength, Atlas - stamina, Zeus - power, Achilles - Courage, and Mercury - speed. Shazam relates to the young boy that he needs a new champion to battle evil and that he has chosen Billy. "Speak my name" shouts Shazam! As Billy shouts the name of the ancient wizard, lightning drops from the ceiling of the chamber striking him, while at the same time a deafening peal of thunder echoes off the cavern walls. As the smoke clears, Billy discovers that he has been transformed into a man! "Captain Marvel, I salute you," says Shazam! At that moment a slab of stone hanging above Shazam’s head, held in place by a tattered thread, crashes down onto the old wizard crushing him. From the dust and rumble a ghostly image of Shazam appears and lights a nearby brazier. At that, Captain Marvel sets off to track down the evil radio silencer plaguing his fair city — and at that Captain Marvel meets his arch-nemesis for the first time: Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana!
2006-09-01 12:28:08 DarthSkeptical Notes
The Trial of Superman
In 1941, DC entered litigation against Fawcett for copyright infringement. They alleged that Captain Marvel was just a bit too close to Superman for comfort. The case drug on for a decade. In 1951, Fawcett appeared to have won, with the judge declaring that DC had let some of their Superman newspaper strip copyrights wane. In 1952, however, an appellate judge struck down the earlier verdict, awarding DC the victory. Before awarding damages, however, the judge was presented with an out-of-court settlement between the two companies. Sensing by now that the steam was out of the super hero business, Fawcett agreed to cease publication of its comics, and paid $400,000 to DC.

Though barred by this agreement from printing new material, they did retain a level of copyright. When DC revived the characters in 1973's Shazam!, they ironically had to license them from Fawcett. In 1980, long after the Shazam! revival had died a quiet death, DC bought the Fawcett characters outright—just in time to kill off the Earth-S concept in 1985's Crisis.


Popularity
It's worth pointing out that the reason for DC's lawsuit was less about creative violation than it was commercial survival. During the mid-1940s Captain Marvel was the most popular comics character in America. Captain Marvel Adventures sold well over 10 million copies annually at the time. Superman, DC's most popular character, was getting left behind. So DC (or, if you prefer, National) turned to a motto they'd used successfully before: if you can't beat 'em in the marketplace, you take 'em to court.

2006-09-01 11:53:22 DarthSkeptical Bio What the heck is Earth-S?
When DC comics bought the Fawcett line of characters, they faced a problem. How would they explain where these characters were during the time that the Justice Society of America defended the Earth? How could it be that Captain Marvel and Superman never met up in the well-chronicled fight against Nazi Germany? Why wasn't Captain Marvel, Jr. or Mary Marvel one of the original Teen Titans? Why didn't Lex Luthor and Dr. Sivana travel in the same social circles? Wouldn't world-class scientist Jim Barr (aka "Bulletman") have at some time crossed paths with innovators Bruce Wayne or Lex Luthor or at least Ted Kord?

The answer DC came up with for all these questions was that the Fawcett characters lived on a completely different Earth called Earth-S.

Now, to be sure, Earth-S is a bit of retro-continuity. You'll find no mention of Earth-S in the pages of Bulletman or Master Comics or even The Marvel Family.

However, DC did establish a narrative link between their use of the characters and Fawcett's. That link came in the pages of Shazam #1. In a story entitled, "The World's Wickedest Plan" writer Denny O'Neill and Captain Marvel co-creator C.C. Beck connected the stories told in the Golden Age by Fawcett to those told in the Silver and Bronze by DC.

What happened, they said, was that just after the conclusion of the last Fawcett story, Dr. Sivana trapped virtually every Fawcett character (including himself) in a "Suspendium globe" that preserved everyone for two decades in suspended animation. When they awoke, they all were the same apparent age as they had been when Fawcett closed its doors. And, just as soon as it was established that we were witnessing a story involving the same characters that had thrived in the 1940s, DC slipped in the notion of them all being on Earth-S.

Thus, the phrase "of Earth-S" that appears after the names of many characters in this database describes their use from their Golden Age introductions at Fawcett to their demise when Earth-S was destroyed consequent to DC"s Crisis on Infinite Earths.


The origin of Captain Marvel
Alone and on the streets of a major metropolitan city, orphaned newsboy Billy Batson was led into an abandoned subway tunnel by a mysterious stranger. On an out-of-service rail-track an odd and driverless subway car stopped to pick-up Billy and his companion. Following a brief trip, Billy and the stranger disembarked the train and walked down a ancient hallway. On one side of the cavernous hall grotesque statues of the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man: Pride, Envy, Greed, Hatred, Selfishness, Laziness and Injustice loomed. As mysteriously as he appeared the stranger vanishes. Sitting on a throne at the far-end of the hall is a wizened old man with long white hair and a full, almost floor-length white beard. At the old man’s beckoning, Billy steps forward and stops in front of the throne. The old man announces himself by proclaiming, "I am Shazam!," amid a peal of thunder and flash of lightning. As the smoke clears Billy notices the wall behind the wizard is inscribed with the names of six great elders which together form the name SHAZAM: Solomon- wisdom, Hercules - strength, Atlas - stamina, Zeus - power, Achilles - Courage, and Mercury - speed. Shazam relates to the young boy that he needs a new champion to battle evil and that he has chosen Billy. "Speak my name" shouts Shazam! As Billy shouts the name of the ancient wizard, lightning drops from the ceiling of the chamber striking him, while at the same time a deafening peal of thunder echoes off the cavern walls. As the smoke clears, Billy discovers that he has been transformed into a man! "Captain Marvel, I salute you," says Shazam! At that moment a slab of stone hanging above Shazam’s head, held in place by a tattered thread, crashes down onto the old wizard crushing him. From the dust and rumble a ghostly image of Shazam appears and lights a nearby brazier. At that, Captain Marvel sets off to track down the evil radio silencer plaguing his fair city — and at that Captain Marvel meets his arch-nemesis for the first time: Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana!

What the heck is Earth-S?
When DC comics bought the Fawcett line of characters, they faced a problem. How would they explain where these characters were during the time that the Justice Society of America defended the Earth? How could it be that Captain Marvel and Superman never met up in the well-chronicled fight against Nazi Germany? Why wasn't Captain Marvel, Jr. or Mary Marvel one of the original Teen Titans? Why didn't Lex Luthor and Dr. Sivana travel in the same social circles? Wouldn't world-class scientist Jim Barr (aka "Bulletman") have at some time crossed paths with innovators Bruce Wayne or Lex Luthor or at least Ted Kord?

The answer DC came up with for all these questions was that the Fawcett characters lived on a completely different Earth called Earth-S.

Now, to be sure, Earth-S is a bit of retro-continuity. You'll find no mention of Earth-S in the pages of Bulletman or Master Comics or even The Marvel Family.

However, DC did establish a narrative link between their use of the characters and Fawcett's. That link came in the pages of Shazam #1. In a story entitled, "The World's Wickedest Plan" writer Denny O'Neill and Captain Marvel co-creator C.C. Beck connected the stories told in the Golden Age by Fawcett to those told in the Silver and Bronze by DC.

What happened, they said, was that just after the conclusion of the last Fawcett story, Dr. Sivana trapped virtually every Fawcett character (including himself) in a "Suspendium globe" that preserved everyone for two decades in suspended animation. When they awoke, they all were the same apparent age as they had been when Fawcett closed its doors. And, just as soon as it was established that we were witnessing a story involving the same characters that had thrived in the 1940s, DC slipped in the notion of them all being on Earth-S.

Thus, the phrase "of Earth-S" that appears after the names of many characters in this database describes their use from their Golden Age introductions at Fawcett to their demise when Earth-S was destroyed consequent to DC"s Crisis on Infinite Earths.


The origin of Captain Marvel
Alone and on the streets of a major metropolitan city, orphaned newsboy Billy Batson was led into an abandoned subway tunnel by a mysterious stranger. On an out-of-service rail-track an odd and driverless subway car stopped to pick-up Billy and his companion. Following a brief trip, Billy and the stranger disembarked the train and walked down a ancient hallway. On one side of the cavernous hall grotesque statues of the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man: Pride, Envy, Greed, Hatred, Selfishness, Laziness and Injustice loomed. As mysteriously as he appeared the stranger vanishes. Sitting on a throne at the far-end of the hall is a wizened old man with long white hair and a full, almost floor-length white beard. At the old man’s beckoning, Billy steps forward and stops in front of the throne. The old man announces himself by proclaiming, "I am Shazam!," amid a peal of thunder and flash of lightning. As the smoke clears Billy notices the wall behind the wizard is inscribed with the names of six great elders which together form the name SHAZAM: Solomon- wisdom, Hercules - strength, Atlas - stamina, Zeus - power, Achilles - Courage, and Mercury - speed. Shazam relates to the young boy that he needs a new champion to battle evil and that he has chosen Billy. "Speak my name" shouts Shazam! As Billy shouts the name of the ancient wizard, lightning drops from the ceiling of the chamber striking him, while at the same time a deafening peal of thunder echoes off the cavern walls. As the smoke clears, Billy discovers that he has been transformed into a man! "Captain Marvel, I salute you," says Shazam! At that moment a slab of stone hanging above Shazam’s head, held in place by a tattered thread, crashes down onto the old wizard crushing him. From the dust and rumble a ghostly image of Shazam appears and lights a nearby brazier. At that, Captain Marvel sets off to track down the evil radio silencer plaguing his fair city — and at that Captain Marvel meets his arch-nemesis for the first time: Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana!
2006-09-01 11:52:48 DarthSkeptical Bio What the heck is Earth-S?

When DC comics bought the Fawcett line of characters, they faced a problem. How would they explain where these characters were during the time that the Justice Society of America defended the Earth? How could it be that Captain Marvel and Superman never met up in the well-chronicled fight against Nazi Germany? Why wasn't Captain Marvel, Jr. or Mary Marvel one of the original Teen Titans? Why didn't Lex Luthor and Dr. Sivana travel in the same social circles? Wouldn't world-class scientist Jim Barr (aka "Bulletman") have at some time crossed paths with innovators Bruce Wayne or Lex Luthor or at least Ted Kord?

The answer DC came up with for all these questions was that the Fawcett characters lived on a completely different Earth called Earth-S.

Now, to be sure, Earth-S is a bit of retro-continuity. You'll find no mention of Earth-S in the pages of Bulletman or Master Comics or even The Marvel Family.

However, DC did establish a narrative link between their use of the characters and Fawcett's. That link came in the pages of Shazam #1. In a story entitled, "The World's Wickedest Plan" writer Denny O'Neill and Captain Marvel co-creator C.C. Beck connected the stories told in the Golden Age by Fawcett to those told in the Silver and Bronze by DC.

What happened, they said, was that just after the conclusion of the last Fawcett story, Dr. Sivana trapped virtually every Fawcett character (including himself) in a "Suspendium globe" that preserved everyone for two decades in suspended animation. When they awoke, they all were the same apparent age as they had been when Fawcett closed its doors. And, just as soon as it was established that we were witnessing a story involving the same characters that had thrived in the 1940s, DC slipped in the notion of them all being on Earth-S.

Thus, the phrase "of Earth-S" that appears after the names of many characters in this database describes their use from their Golden Age introductions at Fawcett to their demise when Earth-S was destroyed consequent to DC"s Crisis on Infinite Earths. The degree to which this distinction is important varies by character. Some are obvious. Mary Marvel of Earth S is still a girl of the same age as Mary Batson, whereas, the post-Crisis Mary Marvel is older than her counterpart. Dr. Sivana after the COIE, has a stronger businessman vibe about him—like the post-Crisis Lex Luthor. Black Adam was an outright enemy of the Marvel Family on Earth-S, but an on-again, off-again member of the Marvel Family on the post-Crisis Earth. Mr. Tawky Tawny has been given a complex backstory on the post-Crisis Earth which he never had on Earth-S.

For these reasons, it is useful to draw a distinction between the pre- and post-Crisis versions of ex-Fawcett characters.


The origin of Captain Marvel

Alone and on the streets of a major metropolitan city, orphaned newsboy Billy Batson was led into an abandoned subway tunnel by a mysterious stranger. On an out-of-service rail-track an odd and driverless subway car stopped to pick-up Billy and his companion. Following a brief trip, Billy and the stranger disembarked the train and walked down a ancient hallway. On one side of the cavernous hall grotesque statues of the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man: Pride, Envy, Greed, Hatred, Selfishness, Laziness and Injustice loomed. As mysteriously as he appeared the stranger vanishes. Sitting on a throne at the far-end of the hall is a wizened old man with long white hair and a full, almost floor-length white beard. At the old man’s beckoning, Billy steps forward and stops in front of the throne. The old man announces himself by proclaiming, "I am Shazam!," amid a peal of thunder and flash of lightning. As the smoke clears Billy notices the wall behind the wizard is inscribed with the names of six great elders which together form the name SHAZAM: Solomon- wisdom, Hercules - strength, Atlas - stamina, Zeus - power, Achilles - Courage, and Mercury - speed. Shazam relates to the young boy that he needs a new champion to battle evil and that he has chosen Billy. "Speak my name" shouts Shazam! As Billy shouts the name of the ancient wizard, lightning drops from the ceiling of the chamber striking him, while at the same time a deafening peal of thunder echoes off the cavern walls. As the smoke clears, Billy discovers that he has been transformed into a man! "Captain Marvel, I salute you," says Shazam! At that moment a slab of stone hanging above Shazam’s head, held in place by a tattered thread, crashes down onto the old wizard crushing him. From the dust and rumble a ghostly image of Shazam appears and lights a nearby brazier. At that, Captain Marvel sets off to track down the evil radio silencer plaguing his fair city — and at that Captain Marvel meets his arch-nemesis for the first time: Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana!

What the heck is Earth-S?
When DC comics bought the Fawcett line of characters, they faced a problem. How would they explain where these characters were during the time that the Justice Society of America defended the Earth? How could it be that Captain Marvel and Superman never met up in the well-chronicled fight against Nazi Germany? Why wasn't Captain Marvel, Jr. or Mary Marvel one of the original Teen Titans? Why didn't Lex Luthor and Dr. Sivana travel in the same social circles? Wouldn't world-class scientist Jim Barr (aka "Bulletman") have at some time crossed paths with innovators Bruce Wayne or Lex Luthor or at least Ted Kord?

The answer DC came up with for all these questions was that the Fawcett characters lived on a completely different Earth called Earth-S.

Now, to be sure, Earth-S is a bit of retro-continuity. You'll find no mention of Earth-S in the pages of Bulletman or Master Comics or even The Marvel Family.

However, DC did establish a narrative link between their use of the characters and Fawcett's. That link came in the pages of Shazam #1. In a story entitled, "The World's Wickedest Plan" writer Denny O'Neill and Captain Marvel co-creator C.C. Beck connected the stories told in the Golden Age by Fawcett to those told in the Silver and Bronze by DC.

What happened, they said, was that just after the conclusion of the last Fawcett story, Dr. Sivana trapped virtually every Fawcett character (including himself) in a "Suspendium globe" that preserved everyone for two decades in suspended animation. When they awoke, they all were the same apparent age as they had been when Fawcett closed its doors. And, just as soon as it was established that we were witnessing a story involving the same characters that had thrived in the 1940s, DC slipped in the notion of them all being on Earth-S.

Thus, the phrase "of Earth-S" that appears after the names of many characters in this database describes their use from their Golden Age introductions at Fawcett to their demise when Earth-S was destroyed consequent to DC"s Crisis on Infinite Earths.


The origin of Captain Marvel
Alone and on the streets of a major metropolitan city, orphaned newsboy Billy Batson was led into an abandoned subway tunnel by a mysterious stranger. On an out-of-service rail-track an odd and driverless subway car stopped to pick-up Billy and his companion. Following a brief trip, Billy and the stranger disembarked the train and walked down a ancient hallway. On one side of the cavernous hall grotesque statues of the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man: Pride, Envy, Greed, Hatred, Selfishness, Laziness and Injustice loomed. As mysteriously as he appeared the stranger vanishes. Sitting on a throne at the far-end of the hall is a wizened old man with long white hair and a full, almost floor-length white beard. At the old man’s beckoning, Billy steps forward and stops in front of the throne. The old man announces himself by proclaiming, "I am Shazam!," amid a peal of thunder and flash of lightning. As the smoke clears Billy notices the wall behind the wizard is inscribed with the names of six great elders which together form the name SHAZAM: Solomon- wisdom, Hercules - strength, Atlas - stamina, Zeus - power, Achilles - Courage, and Mercury - speed. Shazam relates to the young boy that he needs a new champion to battle evil and that he has chosen Billy. "Speak my name" shouts Shazam! As Billy shouts the name of the ancient wizard, lightning drops from the ceiling of the chamber striking him, while at the same time a deafening peal of thunder echoes off the cavern walls. As the smoke clears, Billy discovers that he has been transformed into a man! "Captain Marvel, I salute you," says Shazam! At that moment a slab of stone hanging above Shazam’s head, held in place by a tattered thread, crashes down onto the old wizard crushing him. From the dust and rumble a ghostly image of Shazam appears and lights a nearby brazier. At that, Captain Marvel sets off to track down the evil radio silencer plaguing his fair city — and at that Captain Marvel meets his arch-nemesis for the first time: Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana!
2006-09-01 11:51:06 DarthSkeptical Bio WHAT THE HECK IS EARTH-S?
When DC comics bought the Fawcett line of characters, they faced a problem. How would they explain where these characters were during the time that the Justice Society of America defended the Earth? How could it be that Captain Marvel and Superman never met up in the well-chronicled fight against Nazi Germany? Why wasn't Captain Marvel, Jr. or Mary Marvel one of the original Teen Titans? Why didn't Lex Luthor and Dr. Sivana travel in the same social circles? Wouldn't world-class scientist Jim Barr (aka "Bulletman") have at some time crossed paths with innovators Bruce Wayne or Lex Luthor or at least Ted Kord?

The answer DC came up with for all these questions was that the Fawcett characters lived on a completely different Earth called Earth-S.

Now, to be sure, Earth-S is a bit of retro-continuity. You'll find no mention of Earth-S in the pages of Bulletman or Master Comics or even The Marvel Family.

However, DC did establish a narrative link between their use of the characters and Fawcett's. That link came in the pages of Shazam #1. In a story entitled, "The World's Wickedest Plan" writer Denny O'Neill and Captain Marvel co-creator C.C. Beck connected the stories told in the Golden Age by Fawcett to those told in the Silver and Bronze by DC.

What happened, they said, was that just after the conclusion of the last Fawcett story, Dr. Sivana trapped virtually every Fawcett character (including himself) in a "Suspendium globe" that preserved everyone for two decades in suspended animation. When they awoke, they all were the same apparent age as they had been when Fawcett closed its doors. And, just as soon as it was established that we were witnessing a story involving the same characters that had thrived in the 1940s, DC slipped in the notion of them all being on Earth-S.

Thus, the phrase "of Earth-S" that appears after the names of many characters in this database describes their use from their Golden Age introductions at Fawcett to their demise when Earth-S was destroyed consequent to DC"s Crisis on Infinite Earths


Alone and on the streets of a major metropolitan city, orphaned newsboy Billy Batson was led into an abandoned subway tunnel by a mysterious stranger. On an out-of-service rail-track an odd and driverless subway car stopped to pick-up Billy and his companion. Following a brief trip, Billy and the stranger disembarked the train and walked down a ancient hallway. On one side of the cavernous hall grotesque statues of the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man: Pride, Envy, Greed, Hatred, Selfishness, Laziness and Injustice loomed. As mysteriously as he appeared the stranger vanishes. Sitting on a throne at the far-end of the hall is a wizened old man with long white hair and a full, almost floor-length white beard. At the old man’s beckoning, Billy steps forward and stops in front of the throne. The old man announces himself by proclaiming, "I am Shazam!," amid a peal of thunder and flash of lightning. As the smoke clears Billy notices the wall behind the wizard is inscribed with the names of six great elders which together form the name SHAZAM: Solomon- wisdom, Hercules - strength, Atlas - stamina, Zeus - power, Achilles - Courage, and Mercury - speed. Shazam relates to the young boy that he needs a new champion to battle evil and that he has chosen Billy. "Speak my name" shouts Shazam! As Billy shouts the name of the ancient wizard, lightning drops from the ceiling of the chamber striking him, while at the same time a deafening peal of thunder echoes off the cavern walls. As the smoke clears, Billy discovers that he has been transformed into a man! "Captain Marvel, I salute you," says Shazam! At that moment a slab of stone hanging above Shazam’s head, held in place by a tattered thread, crashes down onto the old wizard crushing him. From the dust and rumble a ghostly image of Shazam appears and lights a nearby brazier. At that, Captain Marvel sets off to track down the evil radio silencer plaguing his fair city — and at that Captain Marvel meets his arch-nemesis for the first time: Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana!
What the heck is Earth-S?

When DC comics bought the Fawcett line of characters, they faced a problem. How would they explain where these characters were during the time that the Justice Society of America defended the Earth? How could it be that Captain Marvel and Superman never met up in the well-chronicled fight against Nazi Germany? Why wasn't Captain Marvel, Jr. or Mary Marvel one of the original Teen Titans? Why didn't Lex Luthor and Dr. Sivana travel in the same social circles? Wouldn't world-class scientist Jim Barr (aka "Bulletman") have at some time crossed paths with innovators Bruce Wayne or Lex Luthor or at least Ted Kord?

The answer DC came up with for all these questions was that the Fawcett characters lived on a completely different Earth called Earth-S.

Now, to be sure, Earth-S is a bit of retro-continuity. You'll find no mention of Earth-S in the pages of Bulletman or Master Comics or even The Marvel Family.

However, DC did establish a narrative link between their use of the characters and Fawcett's. That link came in the pages of Shazam #1. In a story entitled, "The World's Wickedest Plan" writer Denny O'Neill and Captain Marvel co-creator C.C. Beck connected the stories told in the Golden Age by Fawcett to those told in the Silver and Bronze by DC.

What happened, they said, was that just after the conclusion of the last Fawcett story, Dr. Sivana trapped virtually every Fawcett character (including himself) in a "Suspendium globe" that preserved everyone for two decades in suspended animation. When they awoke, they all were the same apparent age as they had been when Fawcett closed its doors. And, just as soon as it was established that we were witnessing a story involving the same characters that had thrived in the 1940s, DC slipped in the notion of them all being on Earth-S.

Thus, the phrase "of Earth-S" that appears after the names of many characters in this database describes their use from their Golden Age introductions at Fawcett to their demise when Earth-S was destroyed consequent to DC"s Crisis on Infinite Earths. The degree to which this distinction is important varies by character. Some are obvious. Mary Marvel of Earth S is still a girl of the same age as Mary Batson, whereas, the post-Crisis Mary Marvel is older than her counterpart. Dr. Sivana after the COIE, has a stronger businessman vibe about him—like the post-Crisis Lex Luthor. Black Adam was an outright enemy of the Marvel Family on Earth-S, but an on-again, off-again member of the Marvel Family on the post-Crisis Earth. Mr. Tawky Tawny has been given a complex backstory on the post-Crisis Earth which he never had on Earth-S.

For these reasons, it is useful to draw a distinction between the pre- and post-Crisis versions of ex-Fawcett characters.


The origin of Captain Marvel

Alone and on the streets of a major metropolitan city, orphaned newsboy Billy Batson was led into an abandoned subway tunnel by a mysterious stranger. On an out-of-service rail-track an odd and driverless subway car stopped to pick-up Billy and his companion. Following a brief trip, Billy and the stranger disembarked the train and walked down a ancient hallway. On one side of the cavernous hall grotesque statues of the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man: Pride, Envy, Greed, Hatred, Selfishness, Laziness and Injustice loomed. As mysteriously as he appeared the stranger vanishes. Sitting on a throne at the far-end of the hall is a wizened old man with long white hair and a full, almost floor-length white beard. At the old man’s beckoning, Billy steps forward and stops in front of the throne. The old man announces himself by proclaiming, "I am Shazam!," amid a peal of thunder and flash of lightning. As the smoke clears Billy notices the wall behind the wizard is inscribed with the names of six great elders which together form the name SHAZAM: Solomon- wisdom, Hercules - strength, Atlas - stamina, Zeus - power, Achilles - Courage, and Mercury - speed. Shazam relates to the young boy that he needs a new champion to battle evil and that he has chosen Billy. "Speak my name" shouts Shazam! As Billy shouts the name of the ancient wizard, lightning drops from the ceiling of the chamber striking him, while at the same time a deafening peal of thunder echoes off the cavern walls. As the smoke clears, Billy discovers that he has been transformed into a man! "Captain Marvel, I salute you," says Shazam! At that moment a slab of stone hanging above Shazam’s head, held in place by a tattered thread, crashes down onto the old wizard crushing him. From the dust and rumble a ghostly image of Shazam appears and lights a nearby brazier. At that, Captain Marvel sets off to track down the evil radio silencer plaguing his fair city — and at that Captain Marvel meets his arch-nemesis for the first time: Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana!

2006-09-01 11:33:08 DarthSkeptical Bio WHAT THE HECK IS EARTH-S?When DC comics bought the Fawcett line of characters, they faced a problem. How would they explain where these characters were during the time that the Justice Society of America defended the Earth? How could it be that Captain Marvel and Superman never met up in the well-chronicled fight against Nazi Germany? Why wasn't Captain Marvel, Jr. or Mary Marvel one of the original Teen Titans? Why didn't Lex Luthor and Dr. Sivana travel in the same social circles? Wouldn't world-class scientist Jim Barr (aka "Bulletman") have at some time crossed paths with innovators Bruce Wayne or Lex Luthor or at least Ted Kord?

The answer DC came up with for all these questions was that the Fawcett characters lived on a completely different Earth called Earth-S.

Now, to be sure, Earth-S is a bit of retro-continuity. You'll find no mention of Earth-S in the pages of Bulletman or Master Comics or even The Marvel Family.

However, DC did establish a narrative link between their use of the characters and Fawcett's. That link came in the pages of Shazam #1. In a story entitled, "The World's Wickedest Plan" writer Denny O'Neill and Captain Marvel co-creator C.C. Beck connected the stories told in the Golden Age by Fawcett to those told in the Silver and Bronze by DC.

What happened, they said, was that just after the conclusion of the last Fawcett story, Dr. Sivana trapped virtually every Fawcett character (including himself) in a "Suspendium globe" that preserved everyone for two decades in suspended animation. When they awoke, they all were the same apparent age as they had been when Fawcett closed its doors. And, just as soon as it was established that we were witnessing a story involving the same characters that had thrived in the 1940s, DC slipped in the notion of them all being on Earth-S.

Thus, the phrase "of Earth-S" that appears after the names of many characters in this database describes their use from their Golden Age introductions at Fawcett to their demise when Earth-S was destroyed consequent to DC"s Crisis on Infinite Earths

WHAT THE HECK IS EARTH-S?
When DC comics bought the Fawcett line of characters, they faced a problem. How would they explain where these characters were during the time that the Justice Society of America defended the Earth? How could it be that Captain Marvel and Superman never met up in the well-chronicled fight against Nazi Germany? Why wasn't Captain Marvel, Jr. or Mary Marvel one of the original Teen Titans? Why didn't Lex Luthor and Dr. Sivana travel in the same social circles? Wouldn't world-class scientist Jim Barr (aka "Bulletman") have at some time crossed paths with innovators Bruce Wayne or Lex Luthor or at least Ted Kord?

The answer DC came up with for all these questions was that the Fawcett characters lived on a completely different Earth called Earth-S.

Now, to be sure, Earth-S is a bit of retro-continuity. You'll find no mention of Earth-S in the pages of Bulletman or Master Comics or even The Marvel Family.

However, DC did establish a narrative link between their use of the characters and Fawcett's. That link came in the pages of Shazam #1. In a story entitled, "The World's Wickedest Plan" writer Denny O'Neill and Captain Marvel co-creator C.C. Beck connected the stories told in the Golden Age by Fawcett to those told in the Silver and Bronze by DC.

What happened, they said, was that just after the conclusion of the last Fawcett story, Dr. Sivana trapped virtually every Fawcett character (including himself) in a "Suspendium globe" that preserved everyone for two decades in suspended animation. When they awoke, they all were the same apparent age as they had been when Fawcett closed its doors. And, just as soon as it was established that we were witnessing a story involving the same characters that had thrived in the 1940s, DC slipped in the notion of them all being on Earth-S.

Thus, the phrase "of Earth-S" that appears after the names of many characters in this database describes their use from their Golden Age introductions at Fawcett to their demise when Earth-S was destroyed consequent to DC"s Crisis on Infinite Earths


Alone and on the streets of a major metropolitan city, orphaned newsboy Billy Batson was led into an abandoned subway tunnel by a mysterious stranger. On an out-of-service rail-track an odd and driverless subway car stopped to pick-up Billy and his companion. Following a brief trip, Billy and the stranger disembarked the train and walked down a ancient hallway. On one side of the cavernous hall grotesque statues of the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man: Pride, Envy, Greed, Hatred, Selfishness, Laziness and Injustice loomed. As mysteriously as he appeared the stranger vanishes. Sitting on a throne at the far-end of the hall is a wizened old man with long white hair and a full, almost floor-length white beard. At the old man’s beckoning, Billy steps forward and stops in front of the throne. The old man announces himself by proclaiming, "I am Shazam!," amid a peal of thunder and flash of lightning. As the smoke clears Billy notices the wall behind the wizard is inscribed with the names of six great elders which together form the name SHAZAM: Solomon- wisdom, Hercules - strength, Atlas - stamina, Zeus - power, Achilles - Courage, and Mercury - speed. Shazam relates to the young boy that he needs a new champion to battle evil and that he has chosen Billy. "Speak my name" shouts Shazam! As Billy shouts the name of the ancient wizard, lightning drops from the ceiling of the chamber striking him, while at the same time a deafening peal of thunder echoes off the cavern walls. As the smoke clears, Billy discovers that he has been transformed into a man! "Captain Marvel, I salute you," says Shazam! At that moment a slab of stone hanging above Shazam’s head, held in place by a tattered thread, crashes down onto the old wizard crushing him. From the dust and rumble a ghostly image of Shazam appears and lights a nearby brazier. At that, Captain Marvel sets off to track down the evil radio silencer plaguing his fair city — and at that Captain Marvel meets his arch-nemesis for the first time: Dr. Thaddeus Bodog Sivana!
2006-09-01 11:31:28 DarthSkeptical Bio WHAT THE HECK IS EARTH-S?When DC comics bought the Fawcett line of characters, they faced a problem. How would they explain where these characters were during the time that the Justice Society of America defended the Earth? How could it be that Captain Marvel and Superman never met up in the well-chronicled fight against Nazi Germany? Why wasn't Captain Marvel, Jr. or Mary Marvel one of the original Teen Titans? Why didn't Lex Luthor and Dr. Sivana travel in the same social circles? Wouldn't world-class scientist Jim Barr (aka "Bulletman") have at some time crossed paths with innovators Bruce Wayne or Lex Luthor or at least Ted Kord?

The answer DC came up with for all these questions was that the Fawcett characters lived on a completely different Earth called Earth-S.

Now, to be sure, Earth-S is a bit of retro-continuity. You'll find no mention of Earth-S in the pages of Bulletman or Master Comics or even The Marvel Family.

However, DC did establish a narrative link between their use of the characters and Fawcett's. That link came in the pages of Shazam #1. In a story entitled, "The World's Wickedest Plan" writer Denny O'Neill and Captain Marvel co-creator C.C. Beck connected the stories told in the Golden Age by Fawcett to those told in the Silver and Bronze by DC.

What happened, they said, was that just after the conclusion of the last Fawcett story, Dr. Sivana trapped virtually every Fawcett character (including himself) in a "Suspendium globe" that preserved everyone for two decades in suspended animation. When they awoke, they all were the same apparent age as they had been when Fawcett closed its doors. And, just as soon as it was established that we were witnessing a story involving the same characters that had thrived in the 1940s, DC slipped in the notion of them all being on Earth-S.

Thus, the phrase "of Earth-S" that appears after the names of many characters in this database describes their use from their Golden Age introductions at Fawcett to their demise when Earth-S was destroyed consequent to DC"s Crisis on Infinite Earths

2006-09-01 11:31:28 DarthSkeptical Notes Captain Marvel's first DC appearance was in Shazam! #1.
2006-08-30 18:06:16 DarthSkeptical Notes Captain Marvel's first DC appearance was in Shazam! #1.
2006-08-30 04:18:41 DarthSkeptical New Character


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