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Bob Layton Sr.

Contribution History:
Date User Field Old Value New Value
2012-12-30 05:30:27 GordonD Bio Bob Layton has, for all intents and purposes, done it all in the comics industry. In 1978, with writing partner David Michelinie, Bob totally re-imagined Marvel’s Invincible Iron Man, ultimately transforming it from a low-end book into one of Marvel’s all-time best sellers. Bob also launched the first mini-series in comics’ history at Marvel with his highly-praised Hercules—Prince of Power. That series, which Bob Layton wrote and drew, spawned a successful sequel, a graphic novel and is still available to this day in trade paperback format. Layton also revived the original X-Men characters at Marvel with his groundbreaking series--X-Factor. While at Marvel, Bob designed the highly-successful Marvel Secret Wars toy line for Mattel. Additionally, Layton co-created The Huntress (with current DC President, Paul Levitz) which has appeared most recently on the WB’s Birds of Prey live-action television series. Second only to his tenure on Iron Man, Bob is also known for his innovative contributions to the Valiant Comics line-- first as co-architect of the Valiant Universe, and then, as Editor-in-Chief and Senior Vice President. When Bob inherited the controlling reins of the company from his predecessor, Valiant (Voyager Communications, Inc.) was nearly 4 million dollars in the red. Undaunted, Layton succeeded in turning the company’s fortunes around, netting the company nearly 30 million dollars in profits by his second year on the job. In 1994, Valiant was sold to Acclaim Entertainment for the staggering price of 65 million dollars. Among other accomplishments during his tenure at Valiant, Layton created major story concepts and art designs for the highly-successful Turok, Dinosaur Hunter video game (the largest selling game in Acclaim’s history--selling over 1.5 million units) and won the comic industry’s most coveted award, Editor of the Year for 1993, as voted by the readers of Wizard Magazine. Bob left Valiant, New York City and the comics industry in 1996, immigrating to Florida to take a long-awaited break from the 'rat race' and cold, cold winters. In 1998, after a short retirement from the industry, Bob returned to the business of creating comics by teaming-up with his fellow Floridian and mentor, Dick Giordano. Bob scripted and inked several co-authored projects with Giordano such as Batman: Dark Knight of the Round Table, Batman: Hollywood Knight, and the six-issue miniseries THE L.A.W. for DC Comics. Also, with original co-plotter, David Michelinie, Bob returned to the pages of Iron Man with a four-part limited series entitled Iron Man: BAD BLOOD. As with many of Bob's previous efforts on the series with David, the story was scripted by Michelinie, while Layton contributed the co-plotting, penciling and inking. After Iron Man: BAD BLOOD, Layton stayed on at Marvel for a short time, teaming up with Dan Jurgens as inker on Captain America, as well as inking a short run on The Avengers. However, his experiences at Marvel, this time around, left Bob cold and disillusioned with mainstream comics in general. Discouraged by the growing lack of professionalism in the business, Dick and Bob, along with head writer David Michelinie, formed Future Comics and it's cast of distinct and unusual properties including Freemind, Deathmask, Metallix and Peacekeeper. One of Future's stated goals was to revolutionize the distribution side of the comics business with the industry's first, totally-autonomous Internet comics company, selling to readers and booksellers alike directly through the world-wide web. The attraction of developing exciting new concepts and business models, in an atmosphere of creative encouragement and support, was this company’s driving force. Although Layton was eventually forced to close that chapter of his career after only two and a half years in business, the Future intellectual properties are still alive and several are currently under development in Hollywood. Bob has been involved in many creative aspects of film and television throughout his career, working with such Hollywood luminaries as Howard Stern, Tracy Torme' (Star Trek, Sliders, Odyssey 5), Scott Winant (Huff, My So-Called Life, Thirtysomething) and George Romero (Night of the Living Dead). Bob is currently working with co--creator David Michelinie and Executive Producer Robert Keyghobad (Carnivale', Cupid) on the development of new properties for major motion pictures and television. In addition, Bob and David have recently returned to Marvel Comics and Iron Man, creating two, new limited series to be released in conjunction with the Iron Man major motion picture in 2008. (Bio copied from www.boblayton.com) Bob Layton has, for all intents and purposes, done it all in the comics industry. In 1978, with writing partner David Michelinie, Bob totally re-imagined Marvel’s Invincible Iron Man, ultimately transforming it from a low-end book into one of Marvel’s all-time best sellers. Bob also wrote and drew the highly-praised mini-series Hercules—Prince of Power, which spawned a successful sequel, a graphic novel and is still available to this day in trade paperback format. Layton also revived the original X-Men characters at Marvel with his groundbreaking series--X-Factor. While at Marvel, Bob designed the highly-successful Marvel Secret Wars toy line for Mattel. Additionally, Layton co-created The Huntress (with current DC President, Paul Levitz) which has appeared most recently on the WB’s Birds of Prey live-action television series. Second only to his tenure on Iron Man, Bob is also known for his innovative contributions to the Valiant Comics line-- first as co-architect of the Valiant Universe, and then, as Editor-in-Chief and Senior Vice President. When Bob inherited the controlling reins of the company from his predecessor, Valiant (Voyager Communications, Inc.) was nearly 4 million dollars in the red. Undaunted, Layton succeeded in turning the company’s fortunes around, netting the company nearly 30 million dollars in profits by his second year on the job. In 1994, Valiant was sold to Acclaim Entertainment for the staggering price of 65 million dollars. Among other accomplishments during his tenure at Valiant, Layton created major story concepts and art designs for the highly-successful Turok, Dinosaur Hunter video game (the largest selling game in Acclaim’s history--selling over 1.5 million units) and won the comic industry’s most coveted award, Editor of the Year for 1993, as voted by the readers of Wizard Magazine. Bob left Valiant, New York City and the comics industry in 1996, immigrating to Florida to take a long-awaited break from the 'rat race' and cold, cold winters. In 1998, after a short retirement from the industry, Bob returned to the business of creating comics by teaming-up with his fellow Floridian and mentor, Dick Giordano. Bob scripted and inked several co-authored projects with Giordano such as Batman: Dark Knight of the Round Table, Batman: Hollywood Knight, and the six-issue miniseries THE L.A.W. for DC Comics. Also, with original co-plotter, David Michelinie, Bob returned to the pages of Iron Man with a four-part limited series entitled Iron Man: BAD BLOOD. As with many of Bob's previous efforts on the series with David, the story was scripted by Michelinie, while Layton contributed the co-plotting, penciling and inking. After Iron Man: BAD BLOOD, Layton stayed on at Marvel for a short time, teaming up with Dan Jurgens as inker on Captain America, as well as inking a short run on The Avengers. However, his experiences at Marvel, this time around, left Bob cold and disillusioned with mainstream comics in general. Discouraged by the growing lack of professionalism in the business, Dick and Bob, along with head writer David Michelinie, formed Future Comics and it's cast of distinct and unusual properties including Freemind, Deathmask, Metallix and Peacekeeper. One of Future's stated goals was to revolutionize the distribution side of the comics business with the industry's first, totally-autonomous Internet comics company, selling to readers and booksellers alike directly through the world-wide web. The attraction of developing exciting new concepts and business models, in an atmosphere of creative encouragement and support, was this company’s driving force. Although Layton was eventually forced to close that chapter of his career after only two and a half years in business, the Future intellectual properties are still alive and several are currently under development in Hollywood. Bob has been involved in many creative aspects of film and television throughout his career, working with such Hollywood luminaries as Howard Stern, Tracy Torme' (Star Trek, Sliders, Odyssey 5), Scott Winant (Huff, My So-Called Life, Thirtysomething) and George Romero (Night of the Living Dead). Bob is currently working with co--creator David Michelinie and Executive Producer Robert Keyghobad (Carnivale', Cupid) on the development of new properties for major motion pictures and television. In addition, Bob and David have recently returned to Marvel Comics and Iron Man, creating two, new limited series to be released in conjunction with the Iron Man major motion picture in 2008. (Bio copied from www.boblayton.com)
2009-02-10 00:26:37 stoshmaster DOB September 25, 1953
2008-01-12 20:40:29 bravado Bio Bob Layton has, for all intents and purposes, done it all in the comics industry. In 1978, with writing partner David Michelinie, Bob totally re-imagined Marvel?s Invincible Iron Man, ultimately transforming it from a low-end book into one of Marvel?s all-time best sellers. Bob also launched the first mini-series in comics? history at Marvel with his highly-praised Hercules?Prince of Power. That series, which Bob Layton wrote and drew, spawned a successful sequel, a graphic novel and is still available to this day in trade paperback format. Layton also revived the original X-Men characters at Marvel with his groundbreaking series--X-Factor. While at Marvel, Bob designed the highly-successful Marvel Secret Wars toy line for Mattel Additionally, Layton co-created The Huntress (with current DC President, Paul Levitz) which has appeared most recently on the WB?s Birds of Prey live-action television series. Second only to his tenure on Iron Man, Bob is also known for his innovative contributions to the Valiant Comics line-- first as co-architect of the Valiant Universe, and then, as Editor-in-Chief and Senior Vice President. When Bob inherited the controlling reins of the company from his predecessor, Valiant (Voyager Communications, Inc.) was nearly 4 million dollars in the red. Undaunted, Layton succeeded in turning the company?s fortunes around, netting the company nearly 30 million dollars in profits by his second year on the job. In 1994, Valiant was sold to Acclaim Entertainment for the staggering price of 65 million dollars. Among other accomplishments during his tenure at Valiant, Layton created major story concepts and art designs for the highly-successful Turok, Dinosaur Hunter video game (the largest selling game in Acclaim?s history--selling over 1.5 million units) and won the comic industry?s most coveted award, Editor of the Year for 1993, as voted by the readers of Wizard Magazine. Bob left Valiant, New York City and the comics industry in 1996, immigrating to Florida to take a long-awaited break from the 'rat race' and cold, cold winters. In 1998, after a short retirement from the industry, Bob returned to the business of creating comics by teaming-up with his fellow Floridian and mentor, Dick Giordano. Bob scripted and inked several co-authored projects with Giordano such as Batman: Dark Knight of the Round Table, Batman: Hollywood Knight, and the six-issue miniseries THE L.A.W. for DC Comics. Also, with original co-plotter, David Michelinie, Bob returned to the pages of Iron Man with a four-part limited series entitled Iron Man: BAD BLOOD. As with many of Bob's previous efforts on the series with David, the story was scripted by Michelinie, while Layton contributed the co-plotting, penciling and inking. After Iron Man: BAD BLOOD, Layton stayed on at Marvel for a short time, teaming up with Dan Jurgens as inker on Captain America, as well as inking a short run on The Avengers. However, his experiences at Marvel, this time around, left Bob cold and disillusioned with mainstream comics in general. Discouraged by the growing lack of professionalism in the business, Dick and Bob, along with head writer David Michelinie, formed Future Comics and it's cast of distinct and unusual properties including Freemind, Deathmask, Metallix and Peacekeeper. One of Future's stated goals was to revolutionize the distribution side of the comics business with the industry's first, totally-autonomous Internet comics company, selling to readers and booksellers alike directly through the world-wide web. The attraction of developing exciting new concepts and business models, in an atmosphere of creative encouragement and support, was this company?s driving force. Although Layton was eventually forced to close that chapter of his career after only two and a half years in business, the Future intellectual properties are still alive and several are currently under development in Hollywood. Bob has been involved in many creative aspects of film and television throughout his career, working with such Hollywood luminaries as Howard Stern, Tracy Torme' (Star Trek, Sliders, Odyssey 5), Scott Winant (Huff, My So-Called Life, Thirtysomething) and George Romero (Night of the Living Dead). Bob has no plans to return to mainstream comics in the foreseeable future, preferring to work with co--creator David Michelinie and Executive Producer Robert Keyghobad (Carnivale', Cupid) on the development of new properties for major motion pictures and television. (Bio copied from www.boblayton.com) Bob Layton has, for all intents and purposes, done it all in the comics industry. In 1978, with writing partner David Michelinie, Bob totally re-imagined Marvel’s Invincible Iron Man, ultimately transforming it from a low-end book into one of Marvel’s all-time best sellers. Bob also launched the first mini-series in comics’ history at Marvel with his highly-praised Hercules—Prince of Power. That series, which Bob Layton wrote and drew, spawned a successful sequel, a graphic novel and is still available to this day in trade paperback format. Layton also revived the original X-Men characters at Marvel with his groundbreaking series--X-Factor. While at Marvel, Bob designed the highly-successful Marvel Secret Wars toy line for Mattel. Additionally, Layton co-created The Huntress (with current DC President, Paul Levitz) which has appeared most recently on the WB’s Birds of Prey live-action television series. Second only to his tenure on Iron Man, Bob is also known for his innovative contributions to the Valiant Comics line-- first as co-architect of the Valiant Universe, and then, as Editor-in-Chief and Senior Vice President. When Bob inherited the controlling reins of the company from his predecessor, Valiant (Voyager Communications, Inc.) was nearly 4 million dollars in the red. Undaunted, Layton succeeded in turning the company’s fortunes around, netting the company nearly 30 million dollars in profits by his second year on the job. In 1994, Valiant was sold to Acclaim Entertainment for the staggering price of 65 million dollars. Among other accomplishments during his tenure at Valiant, Layton created major story concepts and art designs for the highly-successful Turok, Dinosaur Hunter video game (the largest selling game in Acclaim’s history--selling over 1.5 million units) and won the comic industry’s most coveted award, Editor of the Year for 1993, as voted by the readers of Wizard Magazine. Bob left Valiant, New York City and the comics industry in 1996, immigrating to Florida to take a long-awaited break from the 'rat race' and cold, cold winters. In 1998, after a short retirement from the industry, Bob returned to the business of creating comics by teaming-up with his fellow Floridian and mentor, Dick Giordano. Bob scripted and inked several co-authored projects with Giordano such as Batman: Dark Knight of the Round Table, Batman: Hollywood Knight, and the six-issue miniseries THE L.A.W. for DC Comics. Also, with original co-plotter, David Michelinie, Bob returned to the pages of Iron Man with a four-part limited series entitled Iron Man: BAD BLOOD. As with many of Bob's previous efforts on the series with David, the story was scripted by Michelinie, while Layton contributed the co-plotting, penciling and inking. After Iron Man: BAD BLOOD, Layton stayed on at Marvel for a short time, teaming up with Dan Jurgens as inker on Captain America, as well as inking a short run on The Avengers. However, his experiences at Marvel, this time around, left Bob cold and disillusioned with mainstream comics in general. Discouraged by the growing lack of professionalism in the business, Dick and Bob, along with head writer David Michelinie, formed Future Comics and it's cast of distinct and unusual properties including Freemind, Deathmask, Metallix and Peacekeeper. One of Future's stated goals was to revolutionize the distribution side of the comics business with the industry's first, totally-autonomous Internet comics company, selling to readers and booksellers alike directly through the world-wide web. The attraction of developing exciting new concepts and business models, in an atmosphere of creative encouragement and support, was this company’s driving force. Although Layton was eventually forced to close that chapter of his career after only two and a half years in business, the Future intellectual properties are still alive and several are currently under development in Hollywood. Bob has been involved in many creative aspects of film and television throughout his career, working with such Hollywood luminaries as Howard Stern, Tracy Torme' (Star Trek, Sliders, Odyssey 5), Scott Winant (Huff, My So-Called Life, Thirtysomething) and George Romero (Night of the Living Dead). Bob is currently working with co--creator David Michelinie and Executive Producer Robert Keyghobad (Carnivale', Cupid) on the development of new properties for major motion pictures and television. In addition, Bob and David have recently returned to Marvel Comics and Iron Man, creating two, new limited series to be released in conjunction with the Iron Man major motion picture in 2008. (Bio copied from www.boblayton.com)
2006-04-22 21:32:06 cafe slab Suffix Sr.


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