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Frank Quitely - 'Vincent Deighan'

Contribution History:
Date User Field Old Value New Value
2010-09-24 12:08:15 rabsten Suffix none
2010-09-24 12:08:15 rabsten Bio Quitely first worked upon the Scottish underground comics title, Electric Soup, in 1990. He wrote and drew The Greens, a parody of The Broons strip published by D.C Thompson. It is at this point that he adopted the pseudonym of Frank Quitely, as he claims that he didn't want his family to see his work, worried that they may have found it upsetting. Initially Electric Soup was only distributed locally in Glasgow, then it was picked up by John Brown Publishing for widespread national UK distribution. This brought Quitely's work to the attention of Judge Dredd Megazine editor David Bishop. He was given work on Shimura, written by Robbie Morrison, and Missionary Man, by Gordon Rennie, quickly rising to prominence and being voted among the fans' favourite five artists in an end-of-year survey. By 1994 he had started work in various stories in Paradox Press's series of Big Book Of graphic novels, as well as work for Dark Horse Presents for Dark Horse Comics. His big break into American comics was Flex Mentallo, a Doom Patrol spin-off written by fellow Glaswegian Grant Morrison for DC Comics' Vertigo imprint, in 1996. Quitely's work proved very popular, and this launched him onto more work for Vertigo. Initially he was put to work on strips for anthology titles such as Weird War Tales, and drew four issues of Jamie Delano's 2020 Visions, as well as various covers for DC. He later drew his first full length graphic novel, Batman: The Scottish Connection (in which The Greens make a cameo appearance when their minibus is forced off the road during a car chase), with writer Alan Grant. The year 2000 saw Quitely and Morrison collaborate again, on JLA:Earth 2. Once again, the graphic novel was met with a hugely positive critical response, and later that year Quitely took over from Bryan Hitch as artist on The Authority, with Mark Millar as writer. This run proved to be highly controversial, and Quitely's art suffered censorship by DC due mainly to the violent content of Millar's stories. In addition, the title was hampered by delays, due in part to Quitely's slow drawing speed and the time he took off to draw the final issue of Morrison's The Invisibles. Quitely abruptly and controversially left The Authority, however, after receiving an offer from Marvel Comics to draw New X-Men, the lure of such a high-profile title and the chance to again team up with Grant Morrison too strong to resist. The pair's first issue saw them dispense with many of the trappings the title was associated with, such as the colourful spandex costumes, and replace them with a more contemporary look and feel. Although provoking an initially hostile response from a section of X-Men fans, the run sold extremely well and brought the title the sort of critical acclaim it had not had for many years. However, Quitely's pace again drew criticism, as a title as high-profile as X-Men could not afford to delay issues while waiting for him to finish, and the three-year run was therefore characterised by the use of many fill-in artists. Despite this, Quitely also managed to find time to illustrate a Neil Gaiman-written story for the hardcover graphic novel, Sandman: Endless Nights. Since leaving New X-Men, Quitely has drawn the mini series We3 in 2004, again in collaboration with Morrison. More than any other series in his career to date, this book was almost unanimously acclaimed by critics for its art and storytelling, and further cemented Quitely's reputation. He has also written and drawn new installments of The Greens for the Scottish underground comic Northern Lightz, and in 2005 Morrison and Quitely designed a series of tarot cards for Intensive Care, the latest album by popstar Robbie Williams. In December 2004, Quitely signed to a two-year exclusive contract with DC Comics, where he is currently illustrating All Star Superman. The twelve issue series, yet another collaboration with Morrison, began publication in November 2005, and has once again attracted near-unanimous praise.[3] At the Baltimore Comic Convention, it was announced that Morrison will continue with a variety of artists on the book. Meanwhile, he has continued to draw covers for Vertigo, for series including Bite Club, Books of Magick : Life During Wartime and the recent American Virgin. Quitely first worked upon the Scottish underground comics title, Electric Soup, in 1990. He wrote and drew The Greens, a parody of The Broons strip published by D.C Thompson. It is at this point that he adopted the pseudonym of Frank Quitely, as he claims that he didn't want his family to see his work, worried that they may have found it upsetting. Initially Electric Soup was only distributed locally in Glasgow, then it was picked up by John Brown Publishing for widespread national UK distribution. This brought Quitely's work to the attention of Judge Dredd Megazine editor David Bishop. He was given work on Shimura, written by Robbie Morrison, and Missionary Man, by Gordon Rennie, quickly rising to prominence and being voted among the fans' favourite five artists in an end-of-year survey. By 1994 he had started work in various stories in Paradox Press's series of Big Book Of graphic novels, as well as work for Dark Horse Presents for Dark Horse Comics. His big break into American comics was Flex Mentallo, a Doom Patrol spin-off written by fellow Glaswegian Grant Morrison for DC Comics' Vertigo imprint, in 1996. Quitely's work proved very popular, and this launched him onto more work for Vertigo. Initially he was put to work on strips for anthology titles such as Weird War Tales, and drew four issues of Jamie Delano's 2020 Visions, as well as various covers for DC. He later drew his first full length graphic novel, Batman: The Scottish Connection (in which The Greens make a cameo appearance when their minibus is forced off the road during a car chase), with writer Alan Grant. The year 2000 saw Quitely and Morrison collaborate again, on JLA:Earth 2. Once again, the graphic novel was met with a hugely positive critical response, and later that year Quitely took over from Bryan Hitch as artist on The Authority, with Mark Millar as writer. This run proved to be highly controversial, and Quitely's art suffered censorship by DC due mainly to the violent content of Millar's stories. In addition, the title was hampered by delays, due in part to Quitely's slow drawing speed and the time he took off to draw the final issue of Morrison's The Invisibles. Quitely abruptly and controversially left The Authority, however, after receiving an offer from Marvel Comics to draw New X-Men, the lure of such a high-profile title and the chance to again team up with Grant Morrison too strong to resist. The pair's first issue saw them dispense with many of the trappings the title was associated with, such as the colourful spandex costumes, and replace them with a more contemporary look and feel. Although provoking an initially hostile response from a section of X-Men fans, the run sold extremely well and brought the title the sort of critical acclaim it had not had for many years. However, Quitely's pace again drew criticism, as a title as high-profile as X-Men could not afford to delay issues while waiting for him to finish, and the three-year run was therefore characterised by the use of many fill-in artists. Despite this, Quitely also managed to find time to illustrate a Neil Gaiman-written story for the hardcover graphic novel, Sandman: Endless Nights. Since leaving New X-Men, Quitely has drawn the mini series We3 in 2004, again in collaboration with Morrison. More than any other series in his career to date, this book was almost unanimously acclaimed by critics for its art and storytelling, and further cemented Quitely's reputation. He has also written and drawn new installments of The Greens for the Scottish underground comic Northern Lightz, and in 2005 Morrison and Quitely designed a series of tarot cards for Intensive Care, the latest album by popstar Robbie Williams. In December 2004, Quitely signed to a two-year exclusive contract with DC Comics, where he illustrated All Star Superman. The twelve issue series, yet another collaboration with Morrison, began publication in November 2005 and finished in late 2008. It once again attracted near-unanimous praise.[3] At the Baltimore Comic Convention, it was announced that Morrison will continue with a variety of artists on the book; however, to date no additional issues have been published, or even solicited. Quitely continued to draw covers for Vertigo, for series including Bite Club, Books of Magick : Life During Wartime and the recent American Virgin. In 2009, he again teamed with Morrison, and illustrated the first three issues of Batman and Robin. He has also provided covers for each issue, through #14.
2010-07-13 16:14:19 Merrik First Name Vincent Frank
2010-07-13 16:14:19 Merrik Last Name Deighan Quitely
2010-07-13 16:14:19 Merrik Suffix none
2010-07-13 16:14:19 Merrik Nickname Frank Quitely Vincent Deighan
2009-12-07 10:39:36 GordonD Suffix none
2009-12-07 10:39:36 GordonD Bio Quitely first worked upon the Scottish underground comics title, Electric Soup, in 1990. He wrote and drew The Greens, a parody of The Broons strip published by D.C Thompson. It is at this point that he adopted the pseudonym of Frank Quitely, as he claims that he didn't want his family to see his work, worried that they may have found it upsetting. Initially Electric Soup was only distributed locally in Glasgow, then it was picked up by John Brown Publishing for widespread national UK distribution. This brought Quitely's work to the attention of Judge Dredd Megazine editor David Bishop. He was given work on Shimura, written by Robbie Morrison, and Missionary Man, by Gordon Rennie, quickly rising to prominence and being voted among the fans' favourite five artists in an end-of-year survey. By 1994 he had started work in various stories in Paradox Press's series of Big Book Of graphic novels, as well as work for Dark Horse Presents for Dark Horse Comics. His big break into American comics was Flex Mentallo, a Doom Patrol spin-off written by fellow Glaswegian Grant Morrison for DC Comics' Vertigo imprint, in 1996. Quitely's work proved very popular, and this launched him onto more work for Vertigo. Initially he was put to work on strips for anthology titles such as Weird War Tales, and drew four issues of Jamie Delano's 2020 Visions, as well as various covers for DC. He later drew his first full length graphic novel, Batman: The Scottish Connection, with writer Alan Grant. The year 2000 saw Quitely and Morrison collaborate again, on JLA:Earth 2. Once again, the graphic novel was met with a hugely positive critical response, and later that year Quitely took over from Bryan Hitch as artist on The Authority, with Mark Millar as writer. This run proved to be highly controversial, and Quitely's art suffered censorship by DC due mainly to the violent content of Millar's stories. In addition, the title was hampered by delays, due in part to Quitely's slow drawing speed and the time he took off to draw the final issue of Morrison's The Invisibles. Quitely abruptly and controversially left The Authority, however, after receiving an offer from Marvel Comics to draw New X-Men, the lure of such a high-profile title and the chance to again team up with Grant Morrison too strong to resist. The pair's first issue saw them dispense with many of the trappings the title was associated with, such as the colourful spandex costumes, and replace them with a more contemporary look and feel. Although provoking an initially hostile response from a section of X-Men fans, the run sold extremely well and brought the title the sort of critical acclaim it had not had for many years. However, Quitely's pace again drew criticism, as a title as high-profile as X-Men could not afford to delay issues while waiting for him to finish, and the three-year run was therefore characterised by the use of many fill-in artists. Despite this, Quitely also managed to find time to illustrate a Neil Gaiman-written story for the hardcover graphic novel, Sandman: Endless Nights. Since leaving New X-Men, Quitely has drawn the mini series We3 in 2004, again in collaboration with Morrison. More than any other series in his career to date, this book was almost unanimously acclaimed by critics for its art and storytelling, and further cemented Quitely's reputation. He has also written and drawn new installments of The Greens for the Scottish underground comic Northern Lightz, and in 2005 Morrison and Quitely designed a series of tarot cards for Intensive Care, the latest album by popstar Robbie Williams. In December 2004, Quitely signed to a two-year exclusive contract with DC Comics, where he is currently illustrating All Star Superman. The twelve issue series, yet another collaboration with Morrison, began publication in November 2005, and has once again attracted near-unanimous praise.[3] At the Baltimore Comic Convention, it was announced that Morrison will continue with a variety of artists on the book. Meanwhile, he has continued to draw covers for Vertigo, for series including Bite Club, Books of Magick : Life During Wartime and the recent American Virgin. Quitely first worked upon the Scottish underground comics title, Electric Soup, in 1990. He wrote and drew The Greens, a parody of The Broons strip published by D.C Thompson. It is at this point that he adopted the pseudonym of Frank Quitely, as he claims that he didn't want his family to see his work, worried that they may have found it upsetting. Initially Electric Soup was only distributed locally in Glasgow, then it was picked up by John Brown Publishing for widespread national UK distribution. This brought Quitely's work to the attention of Judge Dredd Megazine editor David Bishop. He was given work on Shimura, written by Robbie Morrison, and Missionary Man, by Gordon Rennie, quickly rising to prominence and being voted among the fans' favourite five artists in an end-of-year survey. By 1994 he had started work in various stories in Paradox Press's series of Big Book Of graphic novels, as well as work for Dark Horse Presents for Dark Horse Comics. His big break into American comics was Flex Mentallo, a Doom Patrol spin-off written by fellow Glaswegian Grant Morrison for DC Comics' Vertigo imprint, in 1996. Quitely's work proved very popular, and this launched him onto more work for Vertigo. Initially he was put to work on strips for anthology titles such as Weird War Tales, and drew four issues of Jamie Delano's 2020 Visions, as well as various covers for DC. He later drew his first full length graphic novel, Batman: The Scottish Connection (in which The Greens make a cameo appearance when their minibus is forced off the road during a car chase), with writer Alan Grant. The year 2000 saw Quitely and Morrison collaborate again, on JLA:Earth 2. Once again, the graphic novel was met with a hugely positive critical response, and later that year Quitely took over from Bryan Hitch as artist on The Authority, with Mark Millar as writer. This run proved to be highly controversial, and Quitely's art suffered censorship by DC due mainly to the violent content of Millar's stories. In addition, the title was hampered by delays, due in part to Quitely's slow drawing speed and the time he took off to draw the final issue of Morrison's The Invisibles. Quitely abruptly and controversially left The Authority, however, after receiving an offer from Marvel Comics to draw New X-Men, the lure of such a high-profile title and the chance to again team up with Grant Morrison too strong to resist. The pair's first issue saw them dispense with many of the trappings the title was associated with, such as the colourful spandex costumes, and replace them with a more contemporary look and feel. Although provoking an initially hostile response from a section of X-Men fans, the run sold extremely well and brought the title the sort of critical acclaim it had not had for many years. However, Quitely's pace again drew criticism, as a title as high-profile as X-Men could not afford to delay issues while waiting for him to finish, and the three-year run was therefore characterised by the use of many fill-in artists. Despite this, Quitely also managed to find time to illustrate a Neil Gaiman-written story for the hardcover graphic novel, Sandman: Endless Nights. Since leaving New X-Men, Quitely has drawn the mini series We3 in 2004, again in collaboration with Morrison. More than any other series in his career to date, this book was almost unanimously acclaimed by critics for its art and storytelling, and further cemented Quitely's reputation. He has also written and drawn new installments of The Greens for the Scottish underground comic Northern Lightz, and in 2005 Morrison and Quitely designed a series of tarot cards for Intensive Care, the latest album by popstar Robbie Williams. In December 2004, Quitely signed to a two-year exclusive contract with DC Comics, where he is currently illustrating All Star Superman. The twelve issue series, yet another collaboration with Morrison, began publication in November 2005, and has once again attracted near-unanimous praise.[3] At the Baltimore Comic Convention, it was announced that Morrison will continue with a variety of artists on the book. Meanwhile, he has continued to draw covers for Vertigo, for series including Bite Club, Books of Magick : Life During Wartime and the recent American Virgin.
2009-06-04 15:42:22 uurandy First Name Frank Vincent
2009-06-04 15:42:22 uurandy Last Name Quitely Deighan
2009-06-04 15:42:22 uurandy Suffix none
2009-06-04 15:42:22 uurandy Nickname Frank Quitely
2009-06-04 15:42:22 uurandy Website http://www.hopestreetstudios.com/frank_quitely.html
2009-02-23 16:04:31 bigby_wolf First Name Vincent Frank
2009-02-23 16:04:31 bigby_wolf Last Name Deighan Quitely
2009-02-23 16:04:31 bigby_wolf Suffix none
2009-02-23 16:04:31 bigby_wolf Nickname Frank Quitely
2008-02-21 11:23:46 misterpace Suffix none
2008-02-21 11:23:46 misterpace Bio http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Quitely Quitely first worked upon the Scottish underground comics title, Electric Soup, in 1990. He wrote and drew The Greens, a parody of The Broons strip published by D.C Thompson. It is at this point that he adopted the pseudonym of Frank Quitely, as he claims that he didn't want his family to see his work, worried that they may have found it upsetting. Initially Electric Soup was only distributed locally in Glasgow, then it was picked up by John Brown Publishing for widespread national UK distribution. This brought Quitely's work to the attention of Judge Dredd Megazine editor David Bishop. He was given work on Shimura, written by Robbie Morrison, and Missionary Man, by Gordon Rennie, quickly rising to prominence and being voted among the fans' favourite five artists in an end-of-year survey. By 1994 he had started work in various stories in Paradox Press's series of Big Book Of graphic novels, as well as work for Dark Horse Presents for Dark Horse Comics. His big break into American comics was Flex Mentallo, a Doom Patrol spin-off written by fellow Glaswegian Grant Morrison for DC Comics' Vertigo imprint, in 1996. Quitely's work proved very popular, and this launched him onto more work for Vertigo. Initially he was put to work on strips for anthology titles such as Weird War Tales, and drew four issues of Jamie Delano's 2020 Visions, as well as various covers for DC. He later drew his first full length graphic novel, Batman: The Scottish Connection, with writer Alan Grant. The year 2000 saw Quitely and Morrison collaborate again, on JLA:Earth 2. Once again, the graphic novel was met with a hugely positive critical response, and later that year Quitely took over from Bryan Hitch as artist on The Authority, with Mark Millar as writer. This run proved to be highly controversial, and Quitely's art suffered censorship by DC due mainly to the violent content of Millar's stories. In addition, the title was hampered by delays, due in part to Quitely's slow drawing speed and the time he took off to draw the final issue of Morrison's The Invisibles. Quitely abruptly and controversially left The Authority, however, after receiving an offer from Marvel Comics to draw New X-Men, the lure of such a high-profile title and the chance to again team up with Grant Morrison too strong to resist. The pair's first issue saw them dispense with many of the trappings the title was associated with, such as the colourful spandex costumes, and replace them with a more contemporary look and feel. Although provoking an initially hostile response from a section of X-Men fans, the run sold extremely well and brought the title the sort of critical acclaim it had not had for many years. However, Quitely's pace again drew criticism, as a title as high-profile as X-Men could not afford to delay issues while waiting for him to finish, and the three-year run was therefore characterised by the use of many fill-in artists. Despite this, Quitely also managed to find time to illustrate a Neil Gaiman-written story for the hardcover graphic novel, Sandman: Endless Nights. Since leaving New X-Men, Quitely has drawn the mini series We3 in 2004, again in collaboration with Morrison. More than any other series in his career to date, this book was almost unanimously acclaimed by critics for its art and storytelling, and further cemented Quitely's reputation. He has also written and drawn new installments of The Greens for the Scottish underground comic Northern Lightz, and in 2005 Morrison and Quitely designed a series of tarot cards for Intensive Care, the latest album by popstar Robbie Williams. In December 2004, Quitely signed to a two-year exclusive contract with DC Comics, where he is currently illustrating All Star Superman. The twelve issue series, yet another collaboration with Morrison, began publication in November 2005, and has once again attracted near-unanimous praise.[3] At the Baltimore Comic Convention, it was announced that Morrison will continue with a variety of artists on the book. Meanwhile, he has continued to draw covers for Vertigo, for series including Bite Club, Books of Magick : Life During Wartime and the recent American Virgin.
2007-11-16 15:39:36 ngrafik First Name Frank Vincent
2007-11-16 15:39:36 ngrafik Last Name Quitely Deighan
2007-11-16 15:39:36 ngrafik Suffix none
2007-11-16 15:39:36 ngrafik Nickname Frank Quitely
2007-11-16 15:39:36 ngrafik Birthplace Glasgow, Scottland Glasgow, Scotland
2007-11-16 15:39:36 ngrafik Bio http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Quitely
2006-06-13 21:40:17 DarthSkeptical Suffix none
2006-06-13 21:40:17 DarthSkeptical Notes Though the artist's real name is Vincent Deighan, he took the name "Frank Quitely" (an anagram of the phrase, "quite frankly"), because he didn't want his family to worry that he had been contributing to the Scottish underground title, Electric Soup.


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