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Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen (1954) TPB Kirby vol. 02

Contribution History:
Date User Field Old Value New Value
2011-06-14 19:38:51 mikebo Notes All reprints no new materials. If volume one, chronicling roughly the 1970-71 "season" of Jimmy Olsen, was an exercise in trying to establish a serious, "relevant" tone for the DCU, volume 2 seems to go in the opposite direction. Here we see what Kirby did with Superman after his version was essentially rejected by DC. Olsen becomes a kind of conduit for the more outrageous excesses of Kirby's mind, who by this point may have begun to feel the premature end to his "Fourth World" saga coming. The stories here, Kirby's last in his run at Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen, are high-concept science fantasy, in which Olsen and Superman frequently go outside the bounds of plausibility, ultimately lose the Fourth World thread, but are never dull.

They are, in this way, an early pre-cursor to some of the "Freak of the Week" stories seen on the TV show, Smallville. Olsen, indeed, fulfills a role in this volume very similar to that of Smallville's Chloe Sullivan, with that same knack for discovering every strange, supernatural thing that might be happening.

[Anderson's work, here, was in redrawing the heads on title characters.]

All reprints no new materials. Introduction by Mark Evanier If volume one, chronicling roughly the 1970-71 "season" of Jimmy Olsen, was an exercise in trying to establish a serious, "relevant" tone for the DCU, volume 2 seems to go in the opposite direction. Here we see what Kirby did with Superman after his version was essentially rejected by DC. Olsen becomes a kind of conduit for the more outrageous excesses of Kirby's mind, who by this point may have begun to feel the premature end to his "Fourth World" saga coming. The stories here, Kirby's last in his run at Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen, are high-concept science fantasy, in which Olsen and Superman frequently go outside the bounds of plausibility, ultimately lose the Fourth World thread, but are never dull.

They are, in this way, an early pre-cursor to some of the "Freak of the Week" stories seen on the TV show, Smallville. Olsen, indeed, fulfills a role in this volume very similar to that of Smallville's Chloe Sullivan, with that same knack for discovering every strange, supernatural thing that might be happening.

[Anderson's work, here, was in redrawing the heads on title characters.]

2011-06-14 19:37:47 mikebo Added Creator Robert 'Bob' Greenberger
2011-06-14 19:37:47 mikebo Added Creator Allen 'Al' Milgrom
2011-06-14 19:37:47 mikebo Added Creator Richard Horie
2011-06-14 19:37:47 mikebo Added Creator Tanya Horie
2011-06-14 19:36:55 mikebo Added Cover Added cover (thumbnail)
2011-06-14 19:36:55 mikebo Added Cover Added cover (large)
2009-11-29 13:08:40 ccl080673 Removed Creator Jack 'King' Kirby
2009-11-29 13:08:40 ccl080673 Removed Creator Jack 'King' Kirby
2009-11-29 13:08:40 ccl080673 Removed Creator Murphy Anderson
2009-11-29 13:08:40 ccl080673 Removed Creator Vincent Joseph Colletta - 'Vince, Vinnie'
2009-11-29 13:08:40 ccl080673 Removed Creator (Unknown Creator)
2009-11-29 13:08:40 ccl080673 Removed Creator (Unknown Creator)
2009-11-29 13:08:40 ccl080673 Removed Creator Jack 'King' Kirby
2009-11-29 13:08:40 ccl080673 Removed Creator E. Nelson Bridwell
2009-11-29 13:08:40 ccl080673 Removed Creator Murray Boltinoff
2009-11-29 13:08:40 ccl080673 Notes If volume one, chronicling roughly the 1970-71 "season" of Jimmy Olsen, was an exercise in trying to establish a serious, "relevant" tone for the DCU, volume 2 seems to go in the opposite direction. Here we see what Kirby did with Superman after his version was essentially rejected by DC. Olsen becomes a kind of conduit for the more outrageous excesses of Kirby's mind, who by this point may have begun to feel the premature end to his "Fourth World" saga coming. The stories here, Kirby's last in his run at Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen, are high-concept science fantasy, in which Olsen and Superman frequently go outside the bounds of plausibility, ultimately lose the Fourth World thread, but are never dull.

They are, in this way, an early pre-cursor to some of the "Freak of the Week" stories seen on the TV show, Smallville. Olsen, indeed, fulfills a role in this volume very similar to that of Smallville's Chloe Sullivan, with that same knack for discovering every strange, supernatural thing that might be happening.

[Anderson's work, here, was in redrawing the heads on title characters.]

All reprints no new materials. If volume one, chronicling roughly the 1970-71 "season" of Jimmy Olsen, was an exercise in trying to establish a serious, "relevant" tone for the DCU, volume 2 seems to go in the opposite direction. Here we see what Kirby did with Superman after his version was essentially rejected by DC. Olsen becomes a kind of conduit for the more outrageous excesses of Kirby's mind, who by this point may have begun to feel the premature end to his "Fourth World" saga coming. The stories here, Kirby's last in his run at Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen, are high-concept science fantasy, in which Olsen and Superman frequently go outside the bounds of plausibility, ultimately lose the Fourth World thread, but are never dull.

They are, in this way, an early pre-cursor to some of the "Freak of the Week" stories seen on the TV show, Smallville. Olsen, indeed, fulfills a role in this volume very similar to that of Smallville's Chloe Sullivan, with that same knack for discovering every strange, supernatural thing that might be happening.

[Anderson's work, here, was in redrawing the heads on title characters.]

2005-12-21 21:01:52 DarthSkeptical Removed Creator Al Plastino
2005-12-21 21:01:52 DarthSkeptical Notes If volume one, chronicling roughly the 1970-71 "season" of Jimmy Olsen, was an exercise in trying to establish a serious, "relevant" tone for the DCU, volume 2 seems to go in the opposite direction. Here we see what Kirby did with Superman after his version was essentially rejected by DC. Olsen becomes a kind of conduit for the more outrageous excesses of Kirby's mind, who by this point may have begun to feel the premature end to his "Fourth World" saga coming. The stories here, Kirby's last in his run at Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen, are high-concept science fantasy, in which Olsen and Superman frequently go outside the bounds of plausibility, ultimately lose the Fourth World thread, but are never dull.

They are, in this way, an early pre-cursor to some of the "Freak of the Week" stories seen on the TV show, Smallville. Olsen, indeed, fulfills a role in this volume very similar to that of Smallville's Chloe Sullivan, with that same knack for discovering every strange, supernatural thing that might be happening.

If volume one, chronicling roughly the 1970-71 "season" of Jimmy Olsen, was an exercise in trying to establish a serious, "relevant" tone for the DCU, volume 2 seems to go in the opposite direction. Here we see what Kirby did with Superman after his version was essentially rejected by DC. Olsen becomes a kind of conduit for the more outrageous excesses of Kirby's mind, who by this point may have begun to feel the premature end to his "Fourth World" saga coming. The stories here, Kirby's last in his run at Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen, are high-concept science fantasy, in which Olsen and Superman frequently go outside the bounds of plausibility, ultimately lose the Fourth World thread, but are never dull.

They are, in this way, an early pre-cursor to some of the "Freak of the Week" stories seen on the TV show, Smallville. Olsen, indeed, fulfills a role in this volume very similar to that of Smallville's Chloe Sullivan, with that same knack for discovering every strange, supernatural thing that might be happening.

[Anderson's work, here, was in redrawing the heads on title characters.]

2005-12-21 20:59:33 DarthSkeptical Notes If volume one, chronicling roughly the 1970-71 "season" of Jimmy Olsen, was an exercise in trying to establish a serious, "relevant" tone for the DCU, volume 2 seems to go in the opposite direction. Here we see what Kirby did with Superman after his version was essentially rejected by DC. Olsen becomes a kind of conduit for the more outrageous excesses of Kirby's mind, who by this point may have begun to feel the premature end to his "Fourth World" saga coming. The stories here, the last in the run of Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen, are high-concept science fantasy, in which Olsen and Superman frequently go outside the bounds of plausibility, sometimes lose the Fourth World thread, but are never dull.

They are, in this way, an early pre-cursor to some of the "Freak of the Week" stories seen on the TV show, Smallville. Olsen, indeed, fulfills a role in this volume very similar to that of Smallville's Chloe Sullivan, with that same knack for discovering every strange, supernatural thing that might be happening.

If volume one, chronicling roughly the 1970-71 "season" of Jimmy Olsen, was an exercise in trying to establish a serious, "relevant" tone for the DCU, volume 2 seems to go in the opposite direction. Here we see what Kirby did with Superman after his version was essentially rejected by DC. Olsen becomes a kind of conduit for the more outrageous excesses of Kirby's mind, who by this point may have begun to feel the premature end to his "Fourth World" saga coming. The stories here, Kirby's last in his run at Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen, are high-concept science fantasy, in which Olsen and Superman frequently go outside the bounds of plausibility, ultimately lose the Fourth World thread, but are never dull.

They are, in this way, an early pre-cursor to some of the "Freak of the Week" stories seen on the TV show, Smallville. Olsen, indeed, fulfills a role in this volume very similar to that of Smallville's Chloe Sullivan, with that same knack for discovering every strange, supernatural thing that might be happening.

2005-12-21 20:54:52 DarthSkeptical Notes If volume one, chronicling roughly the 1970-71 "season" of Jimmy Olsen, was an exercise in trying to establish a serious, "relevant" tone for the DCU, volume 2 seems to go in the opposite direction. Here we see what Kirby did with Superman after his version was essentially rejected by DC. Olsen becomes a kind of conduit for the more outrageous excesses of Kirby's mind, who by this point may have begun to feel the premature end to his "Fourth World" saga coming. The stories here, the last in the run of Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen, are high-concept science fantasy that take Olsen and Superman frequently go outside the bounds of plausibility, sometimes lose the Fourth World thread, but are never dull.

They are, in this way, an early pre-cursor to some of the "Freak of the Weak" stories seen on the TV show, Smallville. Olsen, indeed, fulfills a role in this volume very similar to that of Smallville's Chloe Sullivan, and her knack for discovering every strange, supernatural thing that might be happening.

If volume one, chronicling roughly the 1970-71 "season" of Jimmy Olsen, was an exercise in trying to establish a serious, "relevant" tone for the DCU, volume 2 seems to go in the opposite direction. Here we see what Kirby did with Superman after his version was essentially rejected by DC. Olsen becomes a kind of conduit for the more outrageous excesses of Kirby's mind, who by this point may have begun to feel the premature end to his "Fourth World" saga coming. The stories here, the last in the run of Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen, are high-concept science fantasy, in which Olsen and Superman frequently go outside the bounds of plausibility, sometimes lose the Fourth World thread, but are never dull.

They are, in this way, an early pre-cursor to some of the "Freak of the Week" stories seen on the TV show, Smallville. Olsen, indeed, fulfills a role in this volume very similar to that of Smallville's Chloe Sullivan, with that same knack for discovering every strange, supernatural thing that might be happening.

2005-12-21 20:51:46 DarthSkeptical Notes If volume one, chronicling roughly the 1970-71 "season" of Jimmy Olsen, was an exercise in trying to establish a serious, "relevant" tone for the DCU, volume 2 seems to go in the opposite direction. Here we see what Kirby did with Superman after his version was essentially rejected by DC. Olsen becomes a kind of conduit for the more outrageous excesses of Kirby's mind, who by this point may have begun to feel the premature end to his "Fourth World" saga coming. The stories here, the last in the run of Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen are high-concept science fantasy that take Olsen and Superman frequently go outside the bounds of plausibility, sometimes lose the Fourth World thread, but are never dull.

They are, in this way, an early pre-cursor to some of the "Freak of the Weak" stories seen on the TV show, Smallville. Olsen, indeed, fulfills a role in this volume very similar to that of Smallville's Chloe Sullivan, and her knack for discovering every strange, supernatural thing that might be happening.

If volume one, chronicling roughly the 1970-71 "season" of Jimmy Olsen, was an exercise in trying to establish a serious, "relevant" tone for the DCU, volume 2 seems to go in the opposite direction. Here we see what Kirby did with Superman after his version was essentially rejected by DC. Olsen becomes a kind of conduit for the more outrageous excesses of Kirby's mind, who by this point may have begun to feel the premature end to his "Fourth World" saga coming. The stories here, the last in the run of Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen, are high-concept science fantasy that take Olsen and Superman frequently go outside the bounds of plausibility, sometimes lose the Fourth World thread, but are never dull.

They are, in this way, an early pre-cursor to some of the "Freak of the Weak" stories seen on the TV show, Smallville. Olsen, indeed, fulfills a role in this volume very similar to that of Smallville's Chloe Sullivan, and her knack for discovering every strange, supernatural thing that might be happening.

2005-12-21 20:50:22 DarthSkeptical Added Cover Added cover (thumbnail)
2005-12-21 20:50:22 DarthSkeptical Added Cover Added cover (large)

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